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R&F Encaustic Paint Block - Cerulean Extra Pale, 104 ml block

Item #:01101-5170
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Cerulean Extra Pale
Cerulean Extra Pale

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Product Details

Description:
Encaustic Paint Block
Color:
Cerulean Extra Pale
Mfg #:
113C
Size:
104 ml

Pigment Information

This color contains the following pigments:

PB35-Cerulean Blue

PW6-Titanium White

PW7-Zinc Sulphide White


Pigment Name

PB35-Cerulean Blue

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

cobalt(II) stannate

Chemical Formula

CoO n SnO2

Properties

Cerulean Blue is the standard cool blue, considered the traditional counterpart to Ultramarine, and is often used for painting atmospheric shades. It is quick drying and retains its color well, better than any other blue, in oil paint form. However, it tends to granulate or become chalky in watercolors. It has limited hiding power, is semi-opaque, and is easy to control. Its tinting capacity is low, so it can become lost when mixing.

Permanence

Cerulean Blue has excellent permanence. It is very stable and lightfast.

Toxicity

Cerulean Blue is moderately toxic if inhaled or ingested and slightly toxic if it comes into contact with skin.

History

The name Cerulean Blue comes from the Latin word caelum, meaning sky. This pigment was discovered in 1805 by Andreas Hopfner, but it was not widely available until introduced by Messrs. G. Rowney & Co. in England under the name coeruleum in 1860 for use in aquarelle and oil painting. It was produced by the action of heat on cobalt oxide and other metallic bases.


Pigment Name

PW6-Titanium White

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

titanium dioxide

Chemical Formula

TiO2

Properties

Titanium White is the most brilliant of the white pigments. It is considered an all purpose oil color useful in all techniques and the best all around white. Its masstone is neither warm nor cool, placing it somewhere between Lead White and Zinc White. It is less prone to cracking and yellowing than Lead White, but it still yellows easily. Titanium White dries slowly in oil form, more slowly than Lead White but more quickly than Zinc White. It is opaque in oil and acrylic forms and semi-opaque in watercolor form. This pigment has good chemical stability, and its tinting strength is superior to both Lead White and Zinc White.

Permanence

Titanium White has excellent permanence and lightfastness.

Toxicity

Titanium dioxide is highly stable and is regarded as completely non-toxic. Animal studies give no indiciation that it is absorbed biologically, even after long periods of exposure. The primary safety concern is with inhalation of fine pigment dust particl

History

Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the Earth's crust, however mineral deposits that are economical to mine are less common. Titanium dioxide was first discovered in 1821, although it could not be mass produced until 1919. Widespread use of the pigment began in the 1940s. Since that time, it has become the most commonly used white pigment. The name comes from the Latin word Titan, the name for the elder brother of Kronos and ancestor of the Titans, and from the Greek word tito, meaning day or sun.


Pigment Name

PW7-Zinc Sulphide White

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

zinc sulfide

Chemical Formula

ZnS

Properties

Zinc Sulphide White is a semi-transparent yellowish white pigment. Zinc sulfide and zinc oxide (PW4) are often combined to create a more natural white color. Transparency increases as particle size decreases. When slight impurities are added, zinc sulphide has phospherescent and electroluminescent properties. It is often used to manufacture fluorescent or glow-in-the-dark paints.

Permanence

Zinc Sulphide White has excellent permanence and lightfastness.

Toxicity

Zinc Sulphide is non-toxic, but ore deposits often contain lead. Traces of lead and other impurities may be present in pigment powders. Ingestion is not recommended.

History

Zinc sulfide, when combined with slight impurites, has phospherescent properties. It is often used for "invisible ink" that glows with exposure to ultraviolet light. Zinc sulfide is used in the manufacture of fluorescent paints.


Safety Data Sheet

UPC Code: 836943001077

ASIN #: B005JJVSNK