HomePaint and MediumsOil PaintDa Vinci Professional Fast-Dry AlkydsDa Vinci Professional Fast-Dry Alkyds - Terre Vert, 40 ml Tube

Da Vinci Professional Fast-Dry Alkyds - Terre Vert, 40 ml Tube

Item #:01596-7133
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Terre Vert
Terre Vert
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Product Details

Color:
Terre Vert
Size:
40 ml
No.
87
Mfg #:
87AO

Pigment Information

This color contains the following pigments:

PY43-Brown Ochre

PBk9-Ivory Black

PG18-Viridian


Pigment Name

PY43-Brown Ochre

Pigment Type

Chemical Name

iron(III)-oxide, partly hydrated

Chemical Formula

Fe2O3(• H2O)

Properties

Brown Ochre provides artists with earthtones from cream to brown and is a dull, dark variety of Yellow Ochre. Its transparency varies widely from opaque shades to more transparent ones, which are valued for their use as glazes. It has good hiding power, produces a quick drying paint, and can be safely mixed with other pigments. The highest quality Brown Ochre comes from Cyprus, where it is yellow in its raw form and is roasted to get the deeper brown-red varieties that result when water is removed. (See Yellow Ochre, PY42/43.)

Permanence

Brown Ochre has excellent permanence.

Toxicity

Brown Ochre is non-toxic.

History

Ochre comes from the Greek word ochros, meaning pale yellow. It has been used since prehistoric times, and evidence of its use has been found in some of the earliest known cave paintings in Lascaux, France. It has also been called Goethite, after the German philosopher and mineralogist Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).


Pigment Name

PBk9-Ivory Black

Pigment Type

charred animal bone

Chemical Name

carbon + calcium phosphate

Chemical Formula

C + Ca3(PO4)2 or C × CaPO4

Properties

Ivory Black is a cool, semi-transparent blue-black with a slight brownish undertone and average tinting strength. It mixes well with any color, and creates a range of dull greens when mixed with yellow. It has good properties for use in oil, can be slow to dry in oil form, and should never be used in underpainting or frescoing. Ivory Black is denser than Lamp Black.

Permanence

Ivory Black is very lightfast and has good permanence, though it is considered the least permanent of the major black pigments.

Toxicity

Ivory Black has no significant hazards.

History

Ivory Black is a carbon based black first named as Elephantium, and described in the 4th century BCE as produced by heating ivory scraps in clay pots to reduce the ivory or bone to charcoal. The deviation in names is because the more expensive varieties of this pigment were made by burning ivory, and the less expensive ones by burning animal bone. In the 19th century, the name Ivory Black was finally permitted to be applied to Carbon Black pigments made from bone. True Ivory Black is rare in modern times due to the protection of ivory, and the synthetic variety produced today was discovered in 1929. Bone Black is produced as an industrial pigment.


Pigment Name

PG18-Viridian

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

chromium(III)-oxide dehydrate

Chemical Formula

Cr2O3 • 2 H2O or Cr2(OH3)

Properties

Viridian is the standard green and is stable, powerful, and cold with an emerald green undertone. It has a transparent hue, good tinting strength, a dark masstone that can be almost black at full strength, and a slow drying time in oil form. Viridian is commonly replaced by the darker, more saturated, and staining Phthalo Greens, but its properties make it a necessary part of the palette of an experienced landscape painter.

Permanence

Viridian has excellent permanence, except in high-temperature work, and is highly valued as a glazing color.

Toxicity

Viridian is slightly toxic.

History

Viridian’s name comes from the Latin viridis, meaning green. The process for manufacturing Viridian, or Transparent Oxide of Chromium, was patented by Guignet in Paris in 1859. However, it had actually been discovered by Pannetier and Binet in 1838. Viridian replaced Verdigris, which was reactive and unstable, and Emerald Green, which was a poisonous copper aceto-arsenite used as a rat poison in the sewers of Paris.


Safety Data Sheet

UPC Code: 643822087400

ASIN #: B007GD29V2