Holbein Artists' Soft Pastel - Olive 2

Item #:21947-7710
View Product Details
click image to zoom in
Olive 2
Olive 2

Save For Later

  • My Wish Lists & Curbside Pickup Lists
  • My Blick U List(s)
AP Non-Toxic.

Products bearing the AP seal of the Art & Creative Materials Institute, Inc. (ACMI) are certified non-toxic. A product can be certified non-toxic only if it contains no materials in sufficient quantities to be toxic or injurious to humans, or to cause acute or chronic health problems.

Product Details

Color:
Olive 2
Description:
Olive 1
No.
122
Mfg #:
1570-122

Pigment Information

This color contains the following pigments:

PG7-Phthalo Green

PB29-Ultramarine [Blue]

PR101-Red Iron Oxide

PY97-Permanent Yellow

PY53-Nickel Titanium Yellow


Pigment Name

PG7-Phthalo Green

Pigment Type

organic

Chemical Name

polychlorinated copper(II) phthalocyanine

Chemical Formula

C32H3Cl13CuN8 to C32HCl15CuN8 or C32H16CuN8Cl15 (PG7) or C32Br6Cl10CuN8 (PG36)

Properties

Phthalo Green is a transparent, cool, bright, high intensity color used in oil and acrylics. It comes from a Phthalocyanine Blue pigment where most of the hydrogen atoms have been replaced with chlorine, forming highly stable molecules.  It has similar pigment properties and permanence to Phthalo Blue. It is slow drying and an excellent base color for mixing a range of bright greens. Phthalo Green is considered a very good alternative to Viridian because it is intense and mixes well and can be used to emphasize mineral colors in various tints. However, its tinting strength is very high, so it can overpower other colors.  This pigment most closely resembles the discontinued and toxic Verdigris.

Permanence

Phthalo Greens are completely lightfast and resistant to alkali, acids, solvents, heat, and ultraviolet radiation. They are currently used in inks, coatings, and many plastics due to their stability and are considered a standard pigment in printing ink and the packaging industry.

Toxicity

Phthalo Green has no significant hazards, but it contained PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) until 1982.

History

This bright blue-green was developed in 1935 and has been in use since 1938.


Pigment Name

PB29-Ultramarine [Blue]

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

complex silicate of sodium and aluminum with sulfur

Chemical Formula

Na8-10Al6Si6O24S2-4 or Na6-8Al6Si6O24S2-4

Properties

Ultramarine is the standard warm blue, a brilliant blue pigment that has the most purple and least green in its undertone. It has a moderate to high tinting strength and a beautiful transparency. Synthetic Ultramarine is not as vivid a blue as natural Ultramarine. Ultramarine dries slowly in oil and tends to produce clean, though granular, washes in watercolor. French Ultramarine mixes well with Alizarin colors in oil and watercolor form to create a range of purples and violets. It can dull when mixed with white in acrylic form, but mixes well with other colors. The shade varies based on manufacturer. Considered a great color for glazes, it is not suitable for frescoing.

Permanence

Ultramarine has excellent permanence, although synthetic Ultramarine is not as permanent as natural Ultramarine. It may discolor if exposed to acid because of its sulfuric content.

Toxicity

Ultramarine has no significant hazards.

History

The name for this pigment comes from the Middle Latin ultra, meaning beyond, and mare, meaning sea, because it was imported from Asia to Europe by sea. It is a prominent component of lapis lazuli and was used on Asian temples starting in the 6th century. It was one of the most expensive pigments in 16th century Europe, worth twice its weight in gold, and so was used sparingly and when commissions were larger. Ultramarine is currently imitated by a process invented in France in 1826 by Jean Baptiste Guimet, making blue affordable to artists and extending the range of colors on their palettes.


Pigment Name

PR101-Red Iron Oxide

Pigment Type

earth, synthetic

Chemical Name

iron oxides (synthetic), iron oxide, silica, alumina, lime, and magnesia or hydrated iron oxide

Chemical Formula

Fe2O2 or Fe2O3 • H2O

Properties

Red iron oxide varies in hue and transparency, depending on hydration and slight impurities. Indian Red is a slightly duller, deep brick hue with a bluish undertone. It is very dense and opaque, with excellent tinting strength and covering power. It is dependable when mixing with all other permanent pigments and yields good flesh tints when mixed with Zinc White. It is the synthetic version of PR102, which is a pigment made from earth reds, or natural red iron oxides, and the names applied to PR101 and PR102 often overlap. The synthetic red iron oxides have mostly replaced natural red iron oxides and are brighter, stronger, finer, and more permanent. Indian Red is the highest grade bluish shade. Light Red, English Red, and Venetian Red are yellowish shades. Mars Violet is a dull and subdued bluish or purplish oxide.

Permanence

Red iron oxide is very lightfast with excellent permanence.

Toxicity

Red iron oxide has no significant hazards.

History

Natural red iron oxide comes from the mineral ore hematite, called bloodstone by the ancient Greeks from the word hema, meaning blood. It is one of the oldest pigments, has been used by every major civilization, and was an important mineral for medieval alchemists. It was not widely used in artists' materials until the 17th century and was not produced in large quantities until the 18th century.


Pigment Name

PY97-Permanent Yellow

Pigment Type

organic, monoazo

Chemical Formula

C26H27ClN4O8

Properties

Permanent Yellow PY97 ranges from reddish yellow to greenish yellow with temperature shifts from cool to warm hues. It has good tinting strength and average to slow drying time. Similar in shade to Hansa Yellow 1, it offers much better fastness properties and good heat stability.

Permanence

Pigment PY97 has excellent lightfastness, particularly in the darker shades.

Toxicity

No significant acute hazards of PY97 are known, though chronic hazards have not been well studied.

History

Hansa Yellows were first made in Germany just before WW1 from a series of synthetic dyestuffs called Pigment Yellow. They were intended to be a synthetic replacement for Cadmium Yellow. Permanent Yellow (PY97) represents a further development of this line, with the aim of producing a yellow pigment that is suitable for exterior use.


Pigment Name

PY53-Nickel Titanium Yellow

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

mixed metal oxide

Chemical Formula

(Ti,Ni,Sb)O2

Properties

Nickel Titanium Yellow is one of the cleanest and brightest of the inorganic pigments. It has a low tinting strength and average to slow drying time.

Permanence

Nickel Titanium Yellow has excellent lightfastness and outstanding stability with regard to chemicals, weather, and heat. It is durable in exterior conditions.

Toxicity

Nickel Titanium Yellow is not considered toxic.

History

Nickel Titanium Yellow was developed in the 1960s.


Safety Data Sheet

UPC Code: 4938331291223

ASIN #: B0076QVTJ2