Great American Handmade Pastel - New Penny, 929

Item #:21925-8110
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New Penny
New Penny

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Product Details

Color:
New Penny
No.
929

Pigment Information

This color contains the following pigments:

PW18-Calcium Carbonate

PW20-Mica

PBr7-Burnt Sienna

PY43-Yellow Ochre


Pigment Name

PW18-Calcium Carbonate

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

calcium carbonate

Chemical Formula

CaCO3

Properties

Calcium carbonate, the mineral constituent of chalk, is a low tinting strength, inexpensive white pigment that is often used is a buffer and filler. Because of its low tinting strength, it is overwhelmed by other colors. It is used in gesso and other coatings to give the surface more tooth, a desirable characteristic for some painting techniques.

Permanence

Calcium carbonate is lightfast. Like all carbonates, it reacts with strong acids

Toxicity

Calcium carbonate is completely non-toxic, and is used in many food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical products. However, excessive consumption is not recommended. 

History

Naturally occuring chalk deposits have been mined since prehistoric times. Rocks and minerals that contain calcium carbonate include aragonite, calcite, vaterite, chalk, limestone. marble, and travertine. Calcium carbonate is the principle component of lime, used in many agricultural and industrial applications.


Pigment Name

PW20-Mica

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

aluminum silicate

Chemical Formula

H2KAl3(SiO4)3

Properties

An off-white pigment with complex reflective effects, mica is often used with transparent pigments to create mixed pigments with interference and pearlescent effects.

Permanence

Mica is permanent and lightfast.

Toxicity

Although it is completely non-toxic and not bioreactive, fine particles may be irritating. This is of concern primarily for those exposed occupationally to dry mica powder. Breathing mica particles may cause lung fibrosis and pneumoconiosis.

History

Mica has been used as a pigment since prehistoric times.


Pigment Name

PBr7-Burnt Sienna

Pigment Type

earth

Chemical Name

iron oxides

Chemical Formula

Fe2O3

Properties

Burnt Sienna is a warm, mid-brown color formed by burning the yellow-brown limonite clay called Raw Sienna. It ranges from semi-opaque to semi-transparent due to the combination of its opaque, red-brown mass tone and its transparent, orangey undertone. It is an excellent mixing complement for blues and greens and creates salmon or peach colored tints when mixed with white. It can be useful for subduing bright colors and does not get chalky in dark mixtures.

Permanence

Burnt Sienna has good permanence and is considered one of the most versatile of the permanent pigments.

Toxicity

Burnt Sienna has no significant hazards.

History

Burnt Sienna has been used as a pigment since prehistoric times, but its current name came about during the Renaissance. It comes from the city of Siena, in Italy, and is short for terra di Siena, meaning earth of Siena. Sienna was famous for the mining and production of earth pigments from the Renaissance until World War II. Due to the depletion of clay deposits in Tuscany, Italian siennas now come from other areas, including Sicily and Sardinia.


Pigment Name

PY43-Yellow Ochre

Pigment Type

earth

Chemical Name

iron(III)-oxide, hydrated

Chemical Formula

Fe2O3 • H2O

Properties

Yellow Ochre provides artists with earthtones from cream to brown. It has good hiding power, produces a quick drying paint, and can be safely mixed with other pigments. Its transparency varies widely from opaque shades to more transparent ones, which are valued for their use as glazes. If gypsum is present, Yellow Ochre is not suitable for frescoing. (See Brown Ochre, PY43.) PY42 is made from synthetic iron oxides. PY43 is made from natural iron oxide.

Permanence

Yellow Ochre has excellent permanence because ochres are some of the most permanent pigments available.

Toxicity

Yellow Ochre is non-toxic unless it contains manganese.

History

Ochre comes from the Greek word ochros, meaning pale yellow. It was one of the first pigments to be used by human beings, and evidence of its use has been found at 300,000 year old sites in France and the former Czechoslovakia.


Safety Data Sheet