Great American Handmade Pastel - Beacon 2, 420.2

Item #:21925-3202
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Beacon 2
Beacon 2

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Product Details

Color:
Beacon 2
No.
420.2

Pigment Information

This color contains the following pigments:

PW18-Calcium Carbonate

PB15:1-Phthalo Blue


Pigment Name

PW18-Calcium Carbonate

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

calcium carbonate

Chemical Formula

CaCO3

Properties

Calcium carbonate, the mineral constituent of chalk, is a low tinting strength, inexpensive white pigment that is often used is a buffer and filler. Because of its low tinting strength, it is overwhelmed by other colors. It is used in gesso and other coatings to give the surface more tooth, a desirable characteristic for some painting techniques.

Permanence

Calcium carbonate is lightfast. Like all carbonates, it reacts with strong acids

Toxicity

Calcium carbonate is completely non-toxic, and is used in many food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical products. However, excessive consumption is not recommended. 

History

Naturally occuring chalk deposits have been mined since prehistoric times. Rocks and minerals that contain calcium carbonate include aragonite, calcite, vaterite, chalk, limestone. marble, and travertine. Calcium carbonate is the principle component of lime, used in many agricultural and industrial applications.


Pigment Name

PB15:1-Phthalo Blue

Pigment Type

organic

Chemical Name

alpha copper phthalocyanine

Chemical Formula

C32H16CuN8

Properties

Phthalo Blue PB15:1 is a structural variant of Phthalo Blue PB15 that produces more reddish tones.

Permanence

Phthalo Blues are completely lightfast and stable and are permanent for all paint uses. They are currently used in inks, coatings, and many plastics due to their stability and are considered a standard pigment in printing ink and the packaging industry.

Toxicity

Phthalo Blues have no significant hazards, although those made before 1982 contained some PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls).

History

Developed by chemists using the trade name Monastral Blue, the organic blue dyestuff now known as Phthalo Blue was presented as a pigment in November 1935 in London. Its discovery was accidental. The dark color was observed in a kettle where a dye was being made from a British dyestuff plant. The demand for such a pigment came from commercial printers who wanted a cyan to replace Prussian Blue.


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