Great American Handmade Pastel - Grey's Pain 3, 920.3

Item #:21925-2563
View Product Details
click image to zoom in
Greys Pain 3
Greys Pain 3
Current price:$0.00Blick’s Best Price. This icon indicates that the price shown is the lowest possible price offered for an item, therefore additional discounts cannot be applied.

Save For Later

  • My Wish Lists
  • My BlickU List(s)
California Proposition 65.California Proposition 65

WARNING: CANCER AND REPRODUCTIVE HARM -- WWW.P65WARNINGS.CA.GOV

Gift Idea.

This product makes a great gift!

Product Details

Color:
Grey's Pain 3
No.
920.3

Pigment Information

This color contains the following pigments:

PR170-Naphthol Red

PB15-Phthalo Blue

PW18-Calcium Carbonate

PR123-Perylene Vermilion

PBk9-Ivory Black


Pigment Name

PR170-Naphthol Red

Pigment Type

organic, naphthol AS

Chemical Formula

C26H22N4O4

Properties

Pigment PR170 is a bright deep red with bluish undertones. It has an average drying time. It has two crystaline forms that differ significantly in opacity. The more transparent form (F5RK) tends to be more bluish and is less lightfast.

Permanence

The lightfastness and weatherfastness of Pigment PR170 varies, depending on the application and the crystaline form. The opaque form (F3RK) has very good lightfastness, and is more weather resistant. The transparent form (F5RK) has lightfastness that is considered acceptable in pure applications, but it fades more in tints. Neither form is considered suitable for exterior use.

Toxicity

Naphthol Reds are not considered toxic. They may cause eye, skin, or respiratory irritation. Contact with dry pigment should be avoided.

History

Naphthol pigments are actually dyes that are "laked" to form pigments. First developed by the German chemical company Hoechst A.G. before World War I, their use in artist paints began in the 1920s. Pigment Red PR170 is a Naphthol AS pigment, chemically related to the diarylide yellow pigments. The Naphthol AS pigments comprise a range of reds. They are used in plastics, textiles, and printing inks.


Pigment Name

PB15-Phthalo Blue

Pigment Type

organic

Chemical Name

copper phthalocyanine

Chemical Formula

C32H16CuN8

Properties

Phthalo Blues are pure and clean primary blues with superior covering power. They have a very high tinting strength and tend to overwhelm other pigments, but if color strength can be controlled, they make predictable mixed colors. In oil form, blues are very deep and slow drying. When mixed with other colors or if chlorine is added, Phthalo Blue quickly tends towards green. When using alone, mix with some white, as Phthalo Blue can be semi-transparent and almost black on its own. It is among the most compatible of modern colors with mineral colors and is considered more reliable than Prussian Blue, while sharing the same physical and color properties. Phthalo Blue is a good color for glazing.

Permanence

Phthalo Blues are completely lightfast and stable and are permanent for all paint uses. They are currently used in inks, coatings, and many plastics due to their stability and are considered a standard pigment in printing ink and the packaging industry.

Toxicity

Phthalo Blues have no significant hazards, although those made before 1982 contained some PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls).

History

Developed by chemists using the trade name Monastral Blue, the organic blue dyestuff now known as Phthalo Blue was presented as a pigment in November 1935 in London. Its discovery was accidental. The dark color was observed in a kettle where a dye was being made from a British dyestuff plant. The demand for such a pigment came from commercial printers who wanted a cyan to replace Prussian Blue.


Pigment Name

PW18-Calcium Carbonate

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

calcium carbonate

Chemical Formula

CaCO3

Properties

Calcium carbonate, the mineral constituent of chalk, is a low tinting strength, inexpensive white pigment that is often used is a buffer and filler. Because of its low tinting strength, it is overwhelmed by other colors. It is used in gesso and other coatings to give the surface more tooth, a desirable characteristic for some painting techniques.

Permanence

Calcium carbonate is lightfast. Like all carbonates, it reacts with strong acids

Toxicity

Calcium carbonate is completely non-toxic, and is used in many food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical products. However, excessive consumption is not recommended. 

History

Naturally occuring chalk deposits have been mined since prehistoric times. Rocks and minerals that contain calcium carbonate include aragonite, calcite, vaterite, chalk, limestone. marble, and travertine. Calcium carbonate is the principle component of lime, used in many agricultural and industrial applications.


Pigment Name

PR123-Perylene Vermilion

Pigment Type

organic, anthraquinone

Chemical Formula

C40H26N2O6

Properties

Perylene Vermilion is a transparent, bright red pigment with high tinting strength. Its transparency makes it useful as a glazing color.

Permanence

Perylene Vermilion has good lightfastness in its masstone, but it has only moderate lightfastness in tints.

Toxicity

Perylene Vermilion is not considered toxic.

History

Perylenes have been used as vat dyes since 1912, but they were not manufactured and sold as pigments until 1957.


Pigment Name

PBk9-Ivory Black

Pigment Type

charred animal bone

Chemical Name

carbon + calcium phosphate

Chemical Formula

C + Ca3(PO4)2 or C × CaPO4

Properties

Ivory Black is a cool, semi-transparent blue-black with a slight brownish undertone and average tinting strength. It mixes well with any color, and creates a range of dull greens when mixed with yellow. It has good properties for use in oil, can be slow to dry in oil form, and should never be used in underpainting or frescoing. Ivory Black is denser than Lamp Black.

Permanence

Ivory Black is very lightfast and has good permanence, though it is considered the least permanent of the major black pigments.

Toxicity

Ivory Black has no significant hazards.

History

Ivory Black is a carbon based black first named as Elephantium, and described in the 4th century BCE as produced by heating ivory scraps in clay pots to reduce the ivory or bone to charcoal. The deviation in names is because the more expensive varieties of this pigment were made by burning ivory, and the less expensive ones by burning animal bone. In the 19th century, the name Ivory Black was finally permitted to be applied to Carbon Black pigments made from bone. True Ivory Black is rare in modern times due to the protection of ivory, and the synthetic variety produced today was discovered in 1929. Bone Black is produced as an industrial pigment.


Safety Data Sheet