HomePaint and MediumsOil PaintMaimeri Artisti Oil ColorsMaimeri Artisti Oil Color - Vandyke Brown, 60 ml tube

Maimeri Artisti Oil Color - Vandyke Brown, 60 ml tube

Item #:02116-8313
View Product Details
click image to zoom in
Van Dyke Brown
Van Dyke Brown

Save For Later

  • My Wishlist(s)
  • My Blick U List(s)
AP Non-Toxic.

Product Details

Color:
Van Dyke Brown
Size:
60 ml
Format:
Tube

Pigment Information

This color contains the following pigments:

Ivory Black

Burnt Sienna

Lamp Black


Pigment Name

Ivory Black

Pigment Type

charred animal bone

Chemical Name

carbon + calcium phosphate

Chemical Formula

C + Ca3(PO4)2 or C × CaPO4

Properties

Ivory Black is a cool, semi-transparent blue-black with a slight brownish undertone and average tinting strength. It mixes well with any color, and creates a range of dull greens when mixed with yellow. It has good properties for use in oil, can be slow to dry in oil form, and should never be used in underpainting or frescoing. Ivory Black is denser than Lamp Black.

Permanence

Ivory Black is very lightfast and has good permanence, though it is considered the least permanent of the major black pigments.

Toxicity

Ivory Black has no significant hazards.

History

Ivory Black is a carbon based black first named as Elephantium, and described in the 4th century BCE as produced by heating ivory scraps in clay pots to reduce the ivory or bone to charcoal. The deviation in names is because the more expensive varieties of this pigment were made by burning ivory, and the less expensive ones by burning animal bone. In the 19th century, the name Ivory Black was finally permitted to be applied to Carbon Black pigments made from bone. True Ivory Black is rare in modern times due to the protection of ivory, and the synthetic variety produced today was discovered in 1929. Bone Black is produced as an industrial pigment.


Pigment Name

Burnt Sienna

Pigment Type

earth

Chemical Name

iron oxides

Chemical Formula

Fe2O3

Properties

Burnt Sienna is a warm, mid-brown color formed by burning the yellow-brown limonite clay called Raw Sienna. It ranges from semi-opaque to semi-transparent due to the combination of its opaque, red-brown mass tone and its transparent, orangey undertone. It is an excellent mixing complement for blues and greens and creates salmon or peach colored tints when mixed with white. It can be useful for subduing bright colors and does not get chalky in dark mixtures.

Permanence

Burnt Sienna has good permanence and is considered one of the most versatile of the permanent pigments.

Toxicity

Burnt Sienna has no significant hazards.

History

Burnt Sienna has been used as a pigment since prehistoric times, but its current name came about during the Renaissance. It comes from the city of Siena, in Italy, and is short for terra di Siena, meaning earth of Siena. Sienna was famous for the mining and production of earth pigments from the Renaissance until World War II. Due to the depletion of clay deposits in Tuscany, Italian siennas now come from other areas, including Sicily and Sardinia.


Pigment Name

Lamp Black

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

carbon

Chemical Formula

C

Properties

Lamp black is a very opaque, heavily staining black pigment that does not have much covering or tinting power. It is typically the most opaque black in watercolor form. Though a very pure black, it tends to muddy slightly in mixtures. Natural sources may be brownish or bluish in tone because of impurities. When used in oil paints, it is one of the slowest drying pigments, and should not be used in underpainting or applied in layers underneath other colors.

Permanence

Lamp Black is very lightfast and absolutely permanent. It is used in all techniques in permanent painting.

Toxicity

Carbon itself is not considered hazardous, however other combustion products that are hazardous are often present as impurities when Lamp Black is produced from natural materials. For this reason, commercial preparations of the pigment should be considere

History

Lamp Black is a carbon based black traditionally produced by collecting soot (known as lampblack) from oil lamps. It has been used as a pigment since prehistoric times. It is the black found in Egyptian murals and tomb decorations and was the most popular black for fresco painting until the development of Mars Black.


Safety Data Sheet

UPC Code: 8018721003325

ASIN #: B07B6R4H3R