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Utrecht Artists' Watercolor Paint - Prussian Green, 14 ml tube

Item #:01766-7582
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Prussian Green
Prussian Green

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Product Details

Color:
Prussian Green
Size:
14 ml

Pigment Information

This color contains the following pigments:

PB27-Prussian Blue

PY150-Nickel Azo Yellow


Pigment Name

PB27-Prussian Blue

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

ferric ferrocyanide/iron(III)-hexacyanoferrate(II)

Chemical Formula

Fe7(CN)18(H2O)x or C6FeN6H4N

Properties

Prussian Blue is a semi-transparent, deep cyan-blue with a greenish undertone and a very high tinting strength unequaled by most pigments. It is similar to Phthalo Blue unless mixed with white, when it gives up intensity and becomes smoky. It can behave erratically and less reliably in oil and watercolor form depending on its manufacture. For permanent painting Phthalo Blue is considered a more reliable choice.

Permanence

Prussian Blue is lightfast and permanent in all techniques except for fresco. When mixed with Zinc White in watercolor or tempera form, it fades upon exposure to light and completely regains its chromatic strength in the dark. Modern manufacturing techniques have made this tendency less of an issue in recent years

Toxicity

Prussian Blue is moderately toxic if ingested. It will emit toxic hydrogen cyanide gas if heated, exposed to ultraviolet radiation, or treated with acid.

History

"The first of the modern pigments," Prussian Blue is the first artificial pigment with a known history. It was discovered by accident in 1704 by the Berlin color maker Heinrich Diesbach, who was trying to create a pigment with a red hue by mixing iron sulfate and potash. The potash Diesbach purchased from a local laboratory had been contaminated by animal oil and blood during previous experimentation. The resulting mixture yielded a very pale red that changed to purple and then deep blue when he tried to concentrate it. Since previous blue pigments came from lapis lazuli, an expensive stone, Diesbach’s discovery was extremely important for artists of the time.


Pigment Name

PY150-Nickel Azo Yellow

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

nickel azomethine yellow

Chemical Formula

C30H18Cl2N6NiO4

Properties

Nickel Azo Yellow is a transparent, moderately staining yellow pigment with high tinting strength. It is considered a good color match in botanical and landscape painting for natural gamboge (NY24), a historic yellow pigment with fair to poor lightfastness.

Permanence

Nickel azomethine yellow has excellent lightfastness.

Toxicity

Nickel azo yellow pigment is mildly toxic, and is often labeled as hazardous. Avoid respiratory and skin exposure to pigment dust. It should be disposed of properly with other hazardous wastes, not washed down the sink. However, the contribution of artist

History

Nickel azomethine yellow has been developed as an artist pigment becasue it is a close match for gamboge, a historic yellow.


Safety Data Sheet