Canvas Rolls

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Acrylic Primed Cotton Rolls

Acrylic Primed Linen Rolls

Oil Primed Linen Rolls

Unprimed Cotton Rolls

Unprimed Linen Rolls

Polyester and Poly Blend Rolls

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What are the standard methods for attaching canvas to stretcher bars?

    There are three standard methods: side stapling, back stapling, and spline finishing. __Side Stapling__ is the least expensive technique for securing the canvas to the stretcher bar because it uses less canvas. Finished pieces are generally framed to hide the staples. __Back stapling__ is a more expensive finishing technique and requires more canvas, but it provides more selvage for future restretching. Some artists paint on the side as well as the face, creating works that don't require framing. __Spline finishing__ is the most expensive finishing technique. Though some artists feel that it's not as easy to restretch a splined canvas as it is a back-stapled canvas, many artists choose splined canvas because it has a neater appearance than other finishes, and because it's popular with their customers. Splined canvas hangs tight to the wall.

  • What's the difference between cotton duck canvas and linen canvas?

    Cotton duck canvas is much less expensive than linen and has become the most popular support for oil and acrylic painting, especially for students. A properly prepared cotton canvas has longevity similar to linen, and it's more flexible and easier to stretch properly. However, cotton duck is considered too flexible for very large paintings. Linen canvas with an oil primer is the classic standard for oil paintings. Though more expensive and harder to stretch properly, linen canvas offers the smoothest and stiffest painting surface and has proven longevity. Strong and durable, linen holds up to a heavy painting hand and doesn't become slack as easily as cotton canvas. For many artists, linen canvas is worth the investment.

  • What surfaces are suitable to paint on when using acrylic paints?

    Because acrylic paint is very adhesive and flexible by nature, it can be used on a wide variety of grounds. It is recommended that an acrylic emulsion "gesso" be used to prepare whatever surface is to be painted. The best surface is a slightly textured one, such as masonite or hardboard. Heavy paper and canvas are also excellent surfaces.