Video Lesson Plans

Blick is excited to announce our new Video Lesson Plans!

We've taken some of our most popular lesson plans and have turned them into easy to follow video lesson plans. Just click play, sit back, and see our great projects come to life.


Shibori Kimono
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NEW VIDEO LESSON PLANS

Grade Level

NEW! Circle Wall Sculpture

The circle has played a role in the art of every culture, often symbolizing unity and completeness. This simple reed-and-paper design demonstrates how balance, emphasis, patterns, rhythm, movement, and unity produce integrality in a piece of visual art.

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5 – 12

NEW! “Glass” Panel Book

A twist on the tunnel book, this in-depth poetry presentation stars repurposed transparent CD cases. Students learn how artists create visual depth in art while designing a book that illustrates an eight-line poem they have selected or written.

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8 – 12

NEW! Make a Fake Cake!

Using the paintings of Wayne Thiebaud as inspiration, students prepare visually delightful, deliciously decorated sculptural cupcakes using a new, voluminous finger paint that spreads like frosting, yet dries to a strong, durable finish.

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K – 8
Special Education

NEW! “Mama” Spider Sculptures

Created as an ode to her mother, one of the largest sculptures in the world is Louise Bourgeois’ “Maman.” — a bronze spider that stands 30 feet tall. These wire and tissue versions assume natural, and sometimes even creepy, poses!

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3 – 12

NEW! Matisse Prints du Soleil

Henri Matisse survived cancer to find a renewed energy and expressionism in artworks he called “scissor paintings.” Inspired by his cut-paper shapes, students can use sunlight or an artificial source to create color-saturated prints on fabric or paper.

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K – 12
Special Education

NEW! “Selfies” (exactly where I want to be)

Creating self portraits is a snap with this easy technique! Facial proportions and features are traced onto clear film, then layered over a background of a student’s own choosing — a location where she or he would most like to take a “selfie.”

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K – 8

NEW! Torn Metal Collage

Inspired by Byzantine mosaics and tapestries, Austrian artist Gustav Klimt was acclaimed for his gilded paintings. Students use metallic paper to create their own opulent artwork, which is then gently embossed and “antiqued” with tempera.

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3 – 12
Special Education

NEW! Beastly Bobblehead

Create a whimsical patterned Bobble Head! The “body” is a clay slab that students texturize by pressing interesting pasta shapes into it. Top with a pinch-pot head — and learn a lesson in balance.

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3 – 12

NEW! Black Velvet Mystery Painting

Applying oil pastels to black rayon fabric makes a striking composition, but when students add UV paint and a black light, the finished paintings really glow.

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K – 12

NEW! Curtain of Leaves Monoprint

Many artists have used trees as an inspiration for their work. Pressed leaves and texture tools are used to make one-of-a-kind, double-sided monoprints. Using a flexible printing block as a plate makes it easy!

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3 – 12

NEW! Shibori Kimono

Experiment with Japanese paper-dyeing techniques using traditional rice papers, then share papers to create simple origami kimonos. The result is a stunning combination of art and culture.

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3 – 12

NEW! Upcycled Saucer Basket

A variety of new “fibers” are being employed today by many basket makers. Use traditional basket-weaving methods combined with fibers of the new age such as newspapers, plastics, wire, or grocery bags!

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5 – 12

NEW! Creative Quill Pens

For over 1000 years, the quill was the principle writing tool in the Western world. Imagine the stories, poems and sketches that can be made with a hybrid quill and dip pen designed to be a work of art in itself!

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3 – 12

Byzantine Bell

Create a copper bell from metal foil and give it a salt-and-vinegar patina! Cut, fold and emboss metal sheet and add a beaded clapper. Watch a patina develop over night and display in or out!

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5 – 12

Simple Silk Screen in the Round

Silk screening is made simple with the use of an embroidery hoop frame and Mod Podge! Simply draw an image on silk screen fabric with a pencil and paint around the outside with Mod Podge. Pull fabric ink though with a squeegee and you're done! Add handpainted details to add even more color.

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2 – 12

Spoon Skulls

Sugar Skulls are a folk art tradition from central and southern Mexico, made as part of the Day of the Dead celebration. Students can create and decorate a long-lasting skull from glow-in-the-dark clay pressed into a common tablespoon used as a mold. Add colorful designs with tempera paint or markers and enjoy Dia de Muertos!

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1 – 8

Steampunk Entomology

Create a futuristic insect specimen using clay, discarded metal pieces, and wire. Make an air dry clay body, push wire legs, antennae and steampunk embellishments into the soft clay, add wings and let dry to harden! Embellish with paints, if desired.

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K – 12

Wire Art Quilt

A decorative, sculptural interpretation of the Friendship Quilt. Wire is an amazing art medium — it can be bent to form a variety of lines, shapes, letters, and images, outlining patterns in the way that individual pieces of fabric make up each square in a traditional quilt. Elementary-age students can work easily with chenille stems and colorful plastic-coated wire while older students will create art with soft steel, aluminum, and copper wire

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3 – 12

Anaglyph Artistry

Make a composition for viewing with 3-D glasses! Turn an original drawing into a three-dimensional anaglyph using red and blue transfer paper with red and blue markers. Then, make the 3-D glasses necessary to make it pop!

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2 – 12

Artist’s Challenge Coins (ACC’s)

Challenge Coins are specially designed and minted for service personnel to recognize an achievement, enhance morale, or to signify membership in (or experience on) a particular mission. Create a personal Artist's Challenge Coin (ACC) by making a small print, collage, stamp, or photo appliqué one side of a coin-shaped wooden disk, and a challenge or message on the reverse.

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K – 12
Special Education

Block-Print Koinobori

In Japan, Children's Day on May 5th is heralded by the appearance of flying fish: carp-shaped windsocks known as “Koinobori”. In this lesson, students design a “scale”-shaped block from soft block printing material and apply it repetitively to outdoor-safe fabric that has been cut in the shape of a fish. Add details like eyes, fins, and a tail using metallic and sparkle paint, and the Koinobori is ready to hang and “swim” through the breeze!

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3 – 12

Butterfield Horse

Construct a high-relief horse using Activa Fast Mache and found objects. Combine a painted and collaged background with a horse made of quick mache, sticks, pine needles, leaves, and shredded papers in the style of Debra Butterfield.

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3 – 12

Concentric Kirigami

A variation on Japanese Origami, Kirigami is created by folding paper and cutting portions away. This surprisingly uncomplicated relief sculpture is assembled with “rings” cut from double-sided sheets of colorful cardstock. The edges of the rings are folded, cut, unfolded, and layered concentrically (placed around the same center point) to make modern-day Kirigami designs.

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3 – 12

Decalcomania: Glue Paint Symmetry Prints

“Decalcomania” was a techique was used by Surrealists to create impromptu paintings controlled largely by chance. Much like a Rorschach Ink-Blot test, they would search for hidden imagery and develop it into a finished painting. This tidy and highly interactive process uses Glue Paint in a finger painting-style of application — without actually touching it. Looking for hidden images and contour lines in the print will fuel the imagination of a young Surrealist!

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K – 12
Special Education

Flower Garden Tiles

Easily make flower tiles by carving clay, filling with plaster, and finishing with liquid watercolors.

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K – 12

Lessons on Lascaux

Create a cave wall that crackles with authenticity! Using a paste made with powdered tempera and a Dura-Lar stencil, make a beautiful 3-D cave creation.

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3 – 12

Make-a-Mock-Moc!

Create a traditional Chippewa or Pucker-top moccasin using canvas, suede or leather remnants, seed beads and paint.

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5 – 12

The Walls are Watching You!

Form a whimsical and functional "pocket" to animate a wall. This project combines the wall pocket with a face jug, creating a fun and whimsical (or scary) face pocket out of clay.

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2 – 12

Upcycled "Wild Thing" Mittens

An outgrown sweater becomes a fun pair of costume mittens! Use a recycled wool sweater, shrink film, and other adornments to create a fun and functional "Wild Thing" mitten.

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K – 12

Dancing Houses

Part cartoonist and part Picasso, the art of Brooklyn-born James Rizzi is highly recognizable. His playful, brilliant images created a style he described as “Urban Primitive.” Students will enjoy making a classroom cityscape of fun and fabulous construction paper buildings. A simple wire armature beneath allows the structure to be playfully positioned -— almost as if it were dancing. This project provides a lesson in movement as design principle.

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K – 9

Easy-Outline Botanical Illustration Prints

Although photography and modern printing processes have replaced the need for cataloguing plant life with detailed drawn and painted illustrations, botanical illustration is still a beloved art. To make an accurate rendering of a plant, students can create an impression in plaster, then trace the shape and details with colored pencil, ink, or watercolor. Mixing and shading for color accuracy and identifying the plant are some of the skills that will be learned in this exercise.

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K – 12

My Daruma

A traditional Japanese weighted toy, Daruma always return to an upright position. This project reveals how to weight the bottom of a plastic egg and cover with instant maché to make these symbols of success, determination, and overcoming adversity.

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3 – 12

Sound Sculpture Inspired by Jean Tinguely

Swiss artist Jean Tinguely created whimsical machine-like contraptions of found metal parts, known as “metamechanics”. In this lesson plan, students create a kinetic sculpture with repurposed metal hardware, found objects, and wire placed so that they deliberately move against one another. Much like Tinguely’s machines, some of the noises may be pleasant — others may not— but each will have a very unique metallic, mechanical “voice.”

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3 – 12

Art-O-Motion 2

Sculptor George Rickey used scientific precision and physics, functioning with wind to construct heavy steel sculptures that seemed to defy gravity and float on air. In this lesson, students create a simple sculpture around a rotary hub with stacked wooden beads and soft wire. When a direct air current is applied to metallic paper “sails” (blow on it!), the sculpture blades turn gently.

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5 – 12

ArtStraw Architecture

Skyscrapers evolved from the inside out — as steel frames became stronger, windows and walls became lighter, like a “skin.” Students can construct high-rise buildings (or low-rise designs) that are extremely light and open — they're made with paper straws and corrugated plastic joints (no glue required). Imagination grows with the construction — higher and higher!

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5 – 12

Color Field Sketchbook

Stain painting was a successful technique employed by Color Field artists Helen Frankenthaler and Morris Louis. They poured diluted acrylic color over large canvases to form “veils” of brilliant color. In this lesson, students will first learn a simple process for creating their own drawing pad, then stain and design a canvas cover for it.

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3 – 12

Many Metals “Day of the Dead” Triptych

Celebrate a happy and colorful Mexican tradition with many metals! Using the skull as a symbol of rebirth, create a triptych with embossed metal, papier mâché, and lots of color and sparkle!

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5 – 12

“Nesting” with Wool

Roll up a felted masterpiece! Students easily create beautiful wool paintings using soap, water, and a little elbow grease.

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K – 12

Prairie-Style Stained Glass Clings

Frank Lloyd Wright referred to his stained glass windows as “light screens” because they interacted with the view behind them, rather than covering or obscuring it. Here, students use geometry and repeating patterns to create a vinyl window cling that incorporates the ideals of Prairie-Style Design.

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K – 12

Recycled Jellies

Learn the anatomy of one of nature’s most fascinating creatures and make a model from some of the very materials that threaten their habitat — plastic bags and fast food containers. These colorful, sparkling jellies are even water-resistant!

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K – 5

Textural Glass Slumping

Create a textured clay mold to use again and again! Carve a design into a slab and bisque fire it. After coating it with kiln wash, this mold can be used many times to impart unique textures to slumped glass pieces.

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3 – 12

White on White Collagraph

Printmaking — starring textures and shapes! A collagraph printing plate is created on a canvas panel using textures found in the classroom, textured gel mediums, or even textures from nature! After a final coat of gel medium is applied, the plate and paper are run through a printing press.

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3 – 12

Sumi-e Resist Painting

NOTE! The liquid wax used in this lesson plan is now tinted green. Artwork produced using this process will not look like the examples shown. Practice the ancient art of sumi-e painting with a modern twist! Paint with diluted wax resist, then reveal your masterpiece by applying black sumi-e ink over the top. The addition of watercolor gives the painting even more interest.

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K – 12

Mehndi Art Gloves

Originating in ancient India, Mehndi is the artistic application of designs to the hands and feet. Students can enjoy the practice of Mehndi without staining their skin by creating radial designs in marker while wearing a glove. The sense of touch while creating the design is an important part of the process.

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K – 12
Special Education

Have a Ball! with distorted self-portraits

Observing and reproducing the distortion caused by a concave reflection is the topic of this lesson plan, as students make self-portraits inspired by M.C. Escher's “Hand with Reflecting Globe.” The canvas is a vinyl bouncing ball. Elementary ages can be challenged to create a continuous painting — with no beginning or end — then “Have a Ball!” playing with their own artwork.

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K – 12
Special Education

Rolly Bowls

Glazing isn't the only way to create beautiful surfaces! Agateware pottery features swirling marbelized colors and was probably first developed to imitate the qualities of agate, a semiprecious stone with striated patterning. These swirling effects can be created by working with thin slabs of colored clay that has been layered to create patterns. This technique allows for both precise patterns and free, random effects.

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3 – 12

Scrimshaw-Style Yupo Engraving

As early as 1750, New England whalers passed the time by engraving nautical artwork on bones, tusks, etc. As a means of experiencing this traditional American craft, students can etch into Yupo using scratch tools, then fill the lines with oil pastel.

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5 – 12

Sole Pendants

In this project, students explore the beauty of texture found in a surprising place... on the soles of their shoes! Texture is all around us, and oftentimes exists right under our noses.

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K – 3

String Painting

Inspired by Huichol Nierikas — beautiful paintings made from yarn pressed onto beeswax — this is a simple way for students to experience the color, geometric linework and symbolism of this Native American art form. Using colorful string applied to an adhesive-backed piece of felt, students create their designs without messy glue or sharp cutting tools.

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3 – 12

Venetian Volto Mask

The Italian word “volto” translates as “face”. These full-face masks were known as “citizen’s masks” because they were originally worn by common people during the Carnival of Venice. By draping acrylic felt over a reusable form and using Rice Paste (a gluten-free maché alternative) to stiffen, students create a sculptural mask that can be decorated with paint, glitter, feathers, rhinestones, etc.

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3 – 12

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