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At Blick, we love those "light bulb" moments when an idea inspires and the creative juices start to flow.

Geared for a wide variety of age and skill levels, we offer hundreds of Lesson Plans designed to meet the National Standards for Visual Art Education and bring the value of creativity to any teaching experience.

All original. All free. Help yourself!

Click here to download our 2016 Lesson Plans Booklet

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Totem Sculpture Stack
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MOST RECENT

Grade Level

NEW! Feng Shui Chimes

Wind chimes are important to the Chinese philosophy of feng shui (translated as “wind-water" in English), believing that the mood and energy of a person's living space can be positively influenced by the tone, construction materials, and placement of a wind chime.This process uses hollow metal tubing and metal rings that provide a metallic chime as they strike one another.

3 – 12

NEW! Veils of Light and Color

In speaking of stained glass windows found in gothic-era cathedrals, French architect Viollett-le-Duc referred to them as “veils of light and color...” This project is far simpler than producing stained glass-type artwork, where pieces fit together and are separated by lead lines. By eliminating those aspects of construction, students are free to use shape, value, and color as they like, with the added element of light to illuminate their creations.

K – 12
Special Education

NEW! Get in Gear!

Gear stencils are the hub of a mixed media piece centered in the Steampunk movement.

5 – 12

NEW! Join the Flock!

Craft a whimsical mixed media sculpture using remnants stored in your "nest". Combine fabric or paper scraps, raffia, pipe cleaners, bits of airdry clay and paint to make an interesting bird or animal sculpture.

2 – 8

NEW! Make your Mark with a Handmade Brush!

Create a customized mark-making brush for ink sketching or painting. Use a brush ferrule to attach sticks, bamboo pieces or upcycled plastic pen cases to make beautiful brushes.

5 – 12

NEW! Masterful Mishima

Creating intricate drawings on clay is easy with the help of a little wax. Use colored slips as the base, then cover with wax. A detailed drawing is done with carving tools, removing the wax from the lines. Black slip is brushed onto the wax and settles only into the carved lines.

3 – 12

NEW! Art in the Shadows

The stark contrast and the half-hidden mystery of a sihouette is a natural attraction for students. As a lesson illustrating positive and negative spacial relationships or to set the mood for Halloween and Dia de los Muertos, here's an idea for silhouettes with a built-in surprise ... they glow in the dark!

3 – 12

NEW! I, Robot

This lesson plan gives students an opportunity to imagine what they would look like as bionic beings. Starting with a dimensional outline of their own features, students use metallic foil, paints, and discarded electronic components to turn their image into science fiction selfies.

3 – 12

Barnacle Wall

Teach a lesson in marine biology while making a barnacle sculpture! Use Claycrete papier mache mix like clay to create a pinch pot barnacle. Add paints or pigments right to the mix for added color. Then, create the carapace, or mouth part by inserting an origami shape made like the childhood game “origami fortune teller”. Mount all the barnacles together on a wall or board to create a colony!

Watch the Video

3 – 8

Brusho Batik

Make a distinctive batik masterpiece on paper using ink crystals and simple resist. By making a batik composition on paper, the ancient method is taught without the vats of dye and pans of melted wax! A gloss medium is trailed onto paper with a plastic squeeze bottle fitted with a writer tip. Next, powdered ink crystals are used wet or dry to create a modern interpretation of an ancient craft.

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3 – 12

Old is New

Make a small scale sculpture tied to the history of found objects as art. What is more plentiful in an art room than a well-used brush that may not have been fully cleaned each time? Whether one large brush, or many glued together, they can be used as the base for an interesting mixed media portrait. After the brush handle is cut, Paperclay makes the upper torso of the figure. Finish using small brushes, acrylic paint, and fine tip permanent markers.

3 – 12

Pierced Porcelain

Make a modern example of traditional Chinese “rice grain” porcelain. A pure white clay combined with a simple slab technique creates the base for a pierced porcelain vessel. With the use of various tools to add pattern and texture, and methods of piercing or puncturing the clay, the result is a beautiful version of an ancient technique.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Toolbox Plaster Painting

“Paint” with plaster and tools to create a fresh, new Buon Fresco! Working with wet plaster is a fun and spontaneous act. When small batches of plaster are combined with textural elements and pigments, fresh and unique works of art are the result!

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5 – 12

Wearable Sculpture

Start with a mask form and end up with an organic mixed media headpiece! With a nod to artist and performer Nick Cave, begin with a rigid mask form as a base. Add the repurposed parts of bendable chipboard insect sculptures, other embellishments, and found materials. The result is a wearable and sculptural headdress! Make one for fun, or to make a statement!

3 – 12

Book Loom

This project gives a whole new meaning to the term “Book Binding”! Turn an old, discarded book into a weaving loom and create an amazing creation of paper and string. Punch a few holes in the pages, string a warp structure and bind, stitch, knot and weave between the lines!

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Inkless Tessellation Prints

Think printmaking requires ink? Think again! A tessellation is a geometric that repeats without overlapping or leaving negative space between repetitions – think of the prints created by M.C. Escher. This transparent plate can be cut with scissors and scratched with a design before “inking” with watersoluble crayons to make tessellating, multi-colored images.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Look Through My Window

A dimensional self-portrait in the style of Edward Hopper. A recurring theme in Hopper’s art is windows, offering glimpses into a story within a painting. What story would be revealed to a viewer looking at your life through a window?

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5 – 12

Lotus Floats

Loy Krathong is the Festival of the Floating Lotus, celebrated in Thailand and other nations. Create a floating artwork with markers, colored pencils or paint on waterproof Mineral Paper, fold it and float it!

2 – 12

Stencil Skyline

A city skyline is a great place to look for shapes and positive/negative spaces between the buildings. Tempera paint won’t stick to stencil paper, so a spritz of water makes it slide right off and run down the paper.

Watch the Video

2 – 12
Special Education

Kokeshi Dolls

Assemble beads, wood turnings and wood shapes to make a small Kokeshi sculpture. These round, limbless figures can be self-portraits, characters, monsters or a reflection of a young artist's imagination.

2 – 12

Leave a Trail!

Using brightly colored felts, paint applied by squeezing rather than brushing, and folding of the fabric to repeat pattern, a vibrant and very individual statement is made on a functional and useful piece of artwork – the book cover.

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5 – 12

Wire Dream Catcher

A decorative, sculptural interpretation of the Native American Tradition

K – 4

Hand It Over!

Combine a hand traced onto clay with a proverb to create a dish imbued with old-fashioned wisdom. Use a simple cut slab and a set of letter stamps add a proverb to a functional ceramic piece. Add an easy-to-make foam stamp and colorful underglazes to make a hand-shaped dish with meaning.

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3 – 12

Hindsight

What's left behind in a rear view mirror offers a lesson on one-point perspective. Create a three-dimensional rear view mirror using self adhesive mounting board, mirror board and markers.

5 – 12

Maritime Miniature in Oils

A first oil painting is an adventure. With a small format and simplified imagery, it becomes a trip worth taking! Learn about the history of maritime painting and create a small ocean or seafaring scene in oils. A quick drying medium speeds up the process. Then "frame" the painting right on the canvas!

5 – 12

Natural Notan

Make a natural notan landscape with the help of vibrantly colored and patterned papers! In Japan, "Notan" is the term used to express the visualization of light and dark as an element of design. Add color, patterns and a landscape format, and something truly unique is created!

3 – 12

Cast-Tissue Tiles

This technique provides a relatively quick and tidy way to create cast papier mâché designs using a texture rubbing plate as a mold and colorful tissue paper. Use it to create tiles, ornaments, valentines, frames — all sorts of great projects that make great gifts, too!

Watch the Video

2 – 8

Magnetic Mon

The Japanese version of the family crest is called a “mon.” Learn about graphic design with a modern, Western mon that can be displayed on a locker or on the family vehicle or refrigerator

2 – 8

Perspective on a String

The traditional way to create string art is to suspend thread or wire above the surface with nails or pins. This lesson uses holes pierced in gridded foam board, making consistent spacing a breeze. Create a horizon and vanishing point for a perspective lesson without using a ruler!

Watch the Video

7 – 12

Sand Sketching

Simple sand becomes an art medium for a resurgent Victorian craft known as “Marmotinto”. This new process keeps the sand suspended in waterbased adhesive so the mess that is usually associated with sand painting is greatly reduced

Watch the Video

K – 12

Face Book

Make an up-close-and-personal sketchbook or journal cover by creating a "face book" out of a cast and painted high relief face. Use quick mache to cast a face mold, then add modeling paste to customize the face. Create a realistic self-portrait, or morph the face into an animal or alien being! Finish with acrylic paint.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Ball Point Engraving

This low-tech method of engraving involves pressing a design into a drawing board by applying pressure through a paper positioned over it. The tool for engraving? A simple ball point pen! The engraving is then revealed by rubbing colorful art sticks over it. Multiple layers of engraving and color can be built up in one image.

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5 – 12

Clay and Basket Fusion

Combine a fired clay pot with reeds and other materials like twine, lanyard material, wire or yarn to create a sculptural vessel that fuses two ancient traditions!

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5 – 12

Greek Book Vase

An upcycled paperback book serves as the basis for a lesson in form. Using french curves, a template of a Greek pottery form is made. Trace the template onto a book, cut the pages, and open the book to reveal a 3-D piece of paper pottery! Glue the Vase to a painted or collaged background for something truly unique.

Watch the Video

6 – 12

Lichtenstein Pop Art Resist

Create a graphic and colorful resist with a nod to Pop Artist Roy Lichtenstein! Start with smooth manga paper and then mix black paint with gloss medium to make a shiny resist. Apply the resist with a brush and texture plates. When dry, apply vivid color using Blick Liquid Watercolors.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Masking Tape Window Masterpieces

Take a serious look at the creative capabilities of a utilitarian medium. On a piece of clear film, many different sizes of masking tape can be layered, bunched, cut, torn, and twisted to achieve a variety of values and textures. Displayed in a window, it will reveal itself in the daytime from inside the room, and at night from the outside looking into the lighted interior.

Watch the Video

2 – 12
Special Education

Pastepaper Mosaic

Use a fun, traditional bookmaking technique to make pastepaper, then cut and tear pieces to make a modern mosaic! Pastepaper is made by pulling rubber combs and tools through paint that has been mixed with rice paste to create interesting patterns and designs. After the pieces are glued in place, pouring medium gives the whole piece the look of a glazed mosaic!

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Red, White and Blue Jean 3D Collage

Utilizing discarded denim, this project is a salute to Jasper Johns' "Flag." Denim provides a wide variety of blue hues and a surprising amount of texture. The fabric can be folded, bunched, twisted, rolled, woven to create dimension, and colorful designs can be added with paint, ink or water-soluble crayons.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Start with a Circle...

Geometric art kicks both the "left" and "right" sides of the brain into gear! Use gridded paper to arrange colorful, pre-cut tissue paper circles. Beginning mathematicians create new colors, patterns and shapes with circles, while more advanced students use smaller sectors to form a variety of angles, shapes and spatial relations.

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

Stitch it Up!

The art of embroidery makes a great accent for a painting done on cloth! Using washes of black and gray acrylic paint on a traditional stitchery cloth results in a striking painting. But, when a pop of color is added with embroidery, it truly stands out!

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Totem Sculpture Stack

Use animal symbolism to create a personal, stackable totem sculpture. Start with airdry clay to create a base and four animals, add a dowel rod, then stack! Once dry, finish with gloss tempera, acrylics, or inks.

3 – 12

Second-Line Parasol

The "second line" refers to the people that fall in behind a parade, dancing to the music, waving banners and twirling parasols. This tradition began post-Civil War with the now-famous Jazz Funeral of New Orleans, and today it fills the streets of the French Quarter regularly, is part of wedding celebrations, and has spread from its roots across the nation. Join the “second-lining” fun with a personally-designed parasol!

3 – 8

Spirit Trees

Legends are plentiful about connections between humans and trees — what will your special tree reveal about you? This "Spirit Tree" is created from lengths of coiling core, glued together and wrapped with wire to impart flexibility to the branches. It can be finished with paint and wire, and personalized with objects or images suspended from the branches or placed around its roots

Watch the Video

1 – 12

Confetti Bowls

If you've ever scooped confetti into the trash and wished it didn't have to be wasted, here's an idea for putting it to use — turn it into an intriguing, artistic bowl or plate.

3 – 8

Figures in Motion

Inspired by the painting and sculpture of Edgar Degas, this lesson allows students to explore proportion and describe movement using a flat, paper doll-type figure that can be manipulated when wet and is rigid when dry.

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5 – 12

Stick-Start Abstractions

A beginner's approach to abstract painting, inspired by the works of Wassily Kandinksy. In this lesson plan, students explore the point and line concept using a simple wooden tool to create a variety of marks on a paper surface.

2 – 8

Tag, You're It!

Learn about urban art, artists, and social responsibility while creating a graffiti-style “tag.” Students are invited to design a signature using lettering of their own design, then express themselves collectively on a temporary wall installation. Vibrant colors “sprayed” onto paper designs give the look of an aerosol spray painting without the danger or mess.

3 – 12

Blow up a Butterfly

Create an O'Keeffe-like butterfly wing in close detail using Plike (plastic-like) paper. Next, add pastels along with iridescent and pearlescent mixing mediums to capture the affect of a butterfly's wing in close-up.

Watch the Video

K – 8

Bowled Over by Picasso

Picasso viewed the ceramic vessels he painted on as a type of canvas that curved. Make a slump or hump molded bowl, then paint colorful imagery on it's interior using underglazes. Finish with clear glaze.

3 – 12

It's Complementary!

Combine some color theory with a fun, dimensional print that pops! Complementary colors are especially pleasing together. Use texture plates and other printing techniques on paper, then cut circles, fold up the edges, and make a checkerboard style three-dimensional print!

K – 8

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