Lesson Plans by Discipline - Sculpture


Mythical Beasts
click to collapse

Grades K – 4

 

Grade Level

NEW! Make a Fake Cake!

Using the paintings of Wayne Thiebaud as inspiration, students prepare visually delightful, deliciously decorated sculptural cupcakes using a new, voluminous finger paint that spreads like frosting, yet dries to a strong, durable finish.

Watch the Video

K – 8
Special Education

NEW! “Mama” Spider Sculptures

Created as an ode to her mother, one of the largest sculptures in the world is Louise Bourgeois’ “Maman.” — a bronze spider that stands 30 feet tall. These wire and tissue versions assume natural, and sometimes even creepy, poses!

Watch the Video

3 – 12

NEW! Beastly Bobblehead

Create a whimsical patterned Bobble Head! The “body” is a clay slab that students texturize by pressing interesting pasta shapes into it. Top with a pinch-pot head — and learn a lesson in balance.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

NEW! Shoe Shrine

Make a sculptural shrine from an outgrown or second-hand shoe! Primed with modeling paste, covered with ornate embellishments, and then aligned vertically, an everyday shoe can become a dramatic backdrop for relics that represent a student’s favorite thing, place, idea, or event.

3 – 12

Steampunk Entomology

Create a futuristic insect specimen using clay, discarded metal pieces, and wire. Make an air dry clay body, push wire legs, antennae and steampunk embellishments into the soft clay, add wings and let dry to harden! Embellish with paints, if desired.

Watch the Video

K – 12

Wire Art Quilt

A decorative, sculptural interpretation of the Friendship Quilt. Wire is an amazing art medium — it can be bent to form a variety of lines, shapes, letters, and images, outlining patterns in the way that individual pieces of fabric make up each square in a traditional quilt. Elementary-age students can work easily with chenille stems and colorful plastic-coated wire while older students will create art with soft steel, aluminum, and copper wire

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Butterfield Horse

Construct a high-relief horse using Activa Fast Mache and found objects. Combine a painted and collaged background with a horse made of quick mache, sticks, pine needles, leaves, and shredded papers in the style of Debra Butterfield.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Convertible “Canned” Sculpture

Composition — the way the elements of a piece of art are arranged and relate to each other — can be difficult to grasp. This lesson plan presents an easy, forgiving way to see the effects of composition while using the dimensional works of Frank Stella as an example. The sculpture is assembled with magnets on a metal can so it can be taken apart and rearranged to see how the composition is affected — what works and what doesn’t.

3 – 12

Flower Garden Tiles

Easily make flower tiles by carving clay, filling with plaster, and finishing with liquid watercolors.

Watch the Video

K – 12

Coral Reef Creation

Brilliantly replicate thousands of years of oceanic evolution in just a few hours. Using clay, paint, and pearlescent mixing medium, along with handmade clay stamps, create a beautiful coral sculpture.

K – 12

Dancing Houses

Part cartoonist and part Picasso, the art of Brooklyn-born James Rizzi is highly recognizable. His playful, brilliant images created a style he described as “Urban Primitive.” Students will enjoy making a classroom cityscape of fun and fabulous construction paper buildings. A simple wire armature beneath allows the structure to be playfully positioned -— almost as if it were dancing. This project provides a lesson in movement as design principle.

Watch the Video

K – 9

New Guinean “Plant Paste” Doll

Make a hand-built ritual doll with only three simple materials! Knead together clay, instant papier mâché and burlap fibers to create an intriguing art doll. Add body paint and embellish by adding seed bead teeth, a shell necklace, or clothing made of burlap.

4 – 12

Recycled Jellies

Learn the anatomy of one of nature’s most fascinating creatures and make a model from some of the very materials that threaten their habitat — plastic bags and fast food containers. These colorful, sparkling jellies are even water-resistant!

Watch the Video

K – 5

Textural Glass Slumping

Create a textured clay mold to use again and again! Carve a design into a slab and bisque fire it. After coating it with kiln wash, this mold can be used many times to impart unique textures to slumped glass pieces.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Rolly Bowls

Glazing isn't the only way to create beautiful surfaces! Agateware pottery features swirling marbelized colors and was probably first developed to imitate the qualities of agate, a semiprecious stone with striated patterning. These swirling effects can be created by working with thin slabs of colored clay that has been layered to create patterns. This technique allows for both precise patterns and free, random effects.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Venetian Volto Mask

The Italian word “volto” translates as “face”. These full-face masks were known as “citizen’s masks” because they were originally worn by common people during the Carnival of Venice. By draping acrylic felt over a reusable form and using Rice Paste (a gluten-free maché alternative) to stiffen, students create a sculptural mask that can be decorated with paint, glitter, feathers, rhinestones, etc.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Watercolor Texture Casts

Molding, casting, sculpting, painting and monoprinting — this simple project pulls all of these together into one low-relief sculpture that demonstrates the elements of texture and color. Texture is defined in clay by pressing objects in or sculpting with tools. Next, the clay is painted with watercolor and covered with papier mâché, which lifts the color as it dries, absorbing it directly into the casting.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Cubist Portrait Bust

The first thing children learn when learning to draw a face or a figure is to view each part as a basic shape. This project approaches sculpture in the same way. Using geometric Styrofoam shapes, students build a bust or torso. The finished result resembles a simplified version of something you might have seen from Picasso or one of the other Cubist painters, only in three dimensions. This project is a good introduction to sculpture for young students.

K – 6

Deconstructed Books

There's more to "deconstructing" a book than just altering the pages. In this project, deconstructing means changing the object from a book to a sculpture. The tools are very basic — scissors, glue, paper punches and a desire to experiment!

3 – 12
Special Education

Architectural Letters

In this lesson plan, students design and construct a 3-dimensional letter using one of their initials. The surface can be decorated with descriptive words and images that are personally meaningful and unique to the student's identity. Instead of wet, messy adhesive, this process uses paper packing tape to create papier mâché. This tape is inexpensive, easy, and tidy to use, and the finished letters are hard and durable.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Rhythm in Layers

Low relief sculpture with design in mind. Layer by layer, piece by piece, this three-dimensional collage is assembled with repetitious shapes and elements, illustrating the principles of rhythm, balance and movement.

Watch the Video

3 – 12
Special Education

Textured Metal Boxes

This lesson plan combines the processes of repoussé and chasing to design a piece that looks as if it may have been crafted by an ancient silversmith. Objects are fixed to a cardboard box before the metal is applied so that the design is embossed into the metal in the style of repoussé. With tools, students then chase the metal around the objects to further define the texture.

Watch the Video

K – 12

Mexican Bowl

This lesson plan is inspired by the brightly colored pottery of Mexico. This simple papier mâché version casts paper pulp into a textured bowl using an existing plastic or ceramic bowl as a mold.

K – 4

High Low Relief Sculpture

This High-Low Relief Sculpture is a variation on the popular three-dimensional pin sculpture toy that can be molded into familiar shapes as pressure is applied from underneath. These sculptures will be stationary with a few other variations, as students use their imaginations to create rolling landscapes, faces, flowers or other images out of different lengths of colorfully painted craft picks.

4 – 6

Stained Glass Flowers

Wonderful, colorful flowers are created with a transparent, flexible paint called “Arti’Stick”. To link with botanical studies, have students study the anatomy of a flower, create and identify its parts.

3 – 8

Three Prisms

Math and science create visual forms and establish structure.“Three Prisms” uses equilateral triangles and parallelograms. The shapes are combined and repeated for a sculpture that makes additional equilateral triangles.

K – 8

Faux Fossil Fun

Experience an archeological dig, right in your own classroom! Students create fossils the way that nature does - by making impressions and filling them

K – 12

Martin Puryear-Inspired Basketry

Students learn the importance of negative space while creating a non-traditional basket by focusing on it as a sculptural element rather than a functional object. Being a non-representational form, these abstract baskets draw attention to volume and space and redefine what a basket is intended for.

3 – 12

Paper Dishes

These papier mâché dishes are an example of utilitarian items that can also be used as décor.

3 – 8

Primitive Semi-Flat Dolls

There is a rich history in dollmaking techniques throughout the centuries. These soft dolls are painted, stuffed and glued together — so the construction is easy and safe.

4 – 6

Wind Catchers

This step-by-step project from Mayco Colors demonstrates how to make insect-themed Wind Catchers from bisqueware pieces.

3 – 8

Animal Masks

From Mayco Colors, this lesson gives students the opportunity to explore the history and function of masks in various cultures and times. Students will be able to learn and master basic hand building and sculpting techniques using either self-hardening clay or clay requiring kiln firing.

K – 6

Bones

A full skeleton illustrates movement during a wide range of activities. The addition of a background turns this project into a more complete artwork.

3 – 6

Classroom Chihuly

Give students an opportunity to enjoy creating random organic forms with color and transparency similar to actual glass.

Watch the Video

2 – 12

Egyptian Relief Sculpture by Amaco

Students should research hieroglyphs and find a hieroglyphic symbol that has meaning to them. They might choose their initial as a their symbol, or create a figure in the style of an Egyptian Queen or Pharaoh.

4 – 6

Tissue Topiary

Topiary is the art of turning living plants into sculptures that are constantly growing and changing — a form of landscape art. In this project, an art topiary is made of a wire base, green tissue paper and twine. Although this Tissue Topiary will require some initial sculpting, no care will be needed after construction!

4 – 12

click to collapse

Grades 5 – 8

 

Grade Level

NEW! Circle Wall Sculpture

The circle has played a role in the art of every culture, often symbolizing unity and completeness. This simple reed-and-paper design demonstrates how balance, emphasis, patterns, rhythm, movement, and unity produce integrality in a piece of visual art.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

NEW! Make a Fake Cake!

Using the paintings of Wayne Thiebaud as inspiration, students prepare visually delightful, deliciously decorated sculptural cupcakes using a new, voluminous finger paint that spreads like frosting, yet dries to a strong, durable finish.

Watch the Video

K – 8
Special Education

NEW! “Mama” Spider Sculptures

Created as an ode to her mother, one of the largest sculptures in the world is Louise Bourgeois’ “Maman.” — a bronze spider that stands 30 feet tall. These wire and tissue versions assume natural, and sometimes even creepy, poses!

Watch the Video

3 – 12

NEW! Beastly Bobblehead

Create a whimsical patterned Bobble Head! The “body” is a clay slab that students texturize by pressing interesting pasta shapes into it. Top with a pinch-pot head — and learn a lesson in balance.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

NEW! Shoe Shrine

Make a sculptural shrine from an outgrown or second-hand shoe! Primed with modeling paste, covered with ornate embellishments, and then aligned vertically, an everyday shoe can become a dramatic backdrop for relics that represent a student’s favorite thing, place, idea, or event.

3 – 12

Steampunk Entomology

Create a futuristic insect specimen using clay, discarded metal pieces, and wire. Make an air dry clay body, push wire legs, antennae and steampunk embellishments into the soft clay, add wings and let dry to harden! Embellish with paints, if desired.

Watch the Video

K – 12

Wire Art Quilt

A decorative, sculptural interpretation of the Friendship Quilt. Wire is an amazing art medium — it can be bent to form a variety of lines, shapes, letters, and images, outlining patterns in the way that individual pieces of fabric make up each square in a traditional quilt. Elementary-age students can work easily with chenille stems and colorful plastic-coated wire while older students will create art with soft steel, aluminum, and copper wire

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Butterfield Horse

Construct a high-relief horse using Activa Fast Mache and found objects. Combine a painted and collaged background with a horse made of quick mache, sticks, pine needles, leaves, and shredded papers in the style of Debra Butterfield.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Convertible “Canned” Sculpture

Composition — the way the elements of a piece of art are arranged and relate to each other — can be difficult to grasp. This lesson plan presents an easy, forgiving way to see the effects of composition while using the dimensional works of Frank Stella as an example. The sculpture is assembled with magnets on a metal can so it can be taken apart and rearranged to see how the composition is affected — what works and what doesn’t.

3 – 12

Flower Garden Tiles

Easily make flower tiles by carving clay, filling with plaster, and finishing with liquid watercolors.

Watch the Video

K – 12

Coral Reef Creation

Brilliantly replicate thousands of years of oceanic evolution in just a few hours. Using clay, paint, and pearlescent mixing medium, along with handmade clay stamps, create a beautiful coral sculpture.

K – 12

Dancing Houses

Part cartoonist and part Picasso, the art of Brooklyn-born James Rizzi is highly recognizable. His playful, brilliant images created a style he described as “Urban Primitive.” Students will enjoy making a classroom cityscape of fun and fabulous construction paper buildings. A simple wire armature beneath allows the structure to be playfully positioned -— almost as if it were dancing. This project provides a lesson in movement as design principle.

Watch the Video

K – 9

Ancient Bas-Relief Casting

Create an ancient "carving" using cast paper and blasa foam!

5 – 12

Art-O-Motion 2

Sculptor George Rickey used scientific precision and physics, functioning with wind to construct heavy steel sculptures that seemed to defy gravity and float on air. In this lesson, students create a simple sculpture around a rotary hub with stacked wooden beads and soft wire. When a direct air current is applied to metallic paper “sails” (blow on it!), the sculpture blades turn gently.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

ArtStraw Architecture

Skyscrapers evolved from the inside out — as steel frames became stronger, windows and walls became lighter, like a “skin.” Students can construct high-rise buildings (or low-rise designs) that are extremely light and open — they're made with paper straws and corrugated plastic joints (no glue required). Imagination grows with the construction — higher and higher!

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Many Metals “Day of the Dead” Triptych

Celebrate a happy and colorful Mexican tradition with many metals! Using the skull as a symbol of rebirth, create a triptych with embossed metal, papier mâché, and lots of color and sparkle!

Watch the Video

5 – 12

New Guinean “Plant Paste” Doll

Make a hand-built ritual doll with only three simple materials! Knead together clay, instant papier mâché and burlap fibers to create an intriguing art doll. Add body paint and embellish by adding seed bead teeth, a shell necklace, or clothing made of burlap.

4 – 12

Recycled Jellies

Learn the anatomy of one of nature’s most fascinating creatures and make a model from some of the very materials that threaten their habitat — plastic bags and fast food containers. These colorful, sparkling jellies are even water-resistant!

Watch the Video

K – 5

Textural Glass Slumping

Create a textured clay mold to use again and again! Carve a design into a slab and bisque fire it. After coating it with kiln wash, this mold can be used many times to impart unique textures to slumped glass pieces.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

African Clay Boxes

By making an animal shaped box out of clay, students honor both the vast diversity of Africa’s animal world, and also create a functional work of art! After choosing a favorite African animal, students will hand build a clay box with lid.

5 – 12

Rolly Bowls

Glazing isn't the only way to create beautiful surfaces! Agateware pottery features swirling marbelized colors and was probably first developed to imitate the qualities of agate, a semiprecious stone with striated patterning. These swirling effects can be created by working with thin slabs of colored clay that has been layered to create patterns. This technique allows for both precise patterns and free, random effects.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Venetian Volto Mask

The Italian word “volto” translates as “face”. These full-face masks were known as “citizen’s masks” because they were originally worn by common people during the Carnival of Venice. By draping acrylic felt over a reusable form and using Rice Paste (a gluten-free maché alternative) to stiffen, students create a sculptural mask that can be decorated with paint, glitter, feathers, rhinestones, etc.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

“Art-O-Motion” Mechanical Sculpture

In 1913, Marcel DuChamp mounted a spinning bicycle wheel to a stool to make what is considered the first kinetic sculpture. Since then, many artists have paired physical science and engineering with artistic vision to create amazing pieces of mechanical sculpture. This simple, pulley-operated design has students design “gears” that spin on spools when a string is pulled.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Watercolor Texture Casts

Molding, casting, sculpting, painting and monoprinting — this simple project pulls all of these together into one low-relief sculpture that demonstrates the elements of texture and color. Texture is defined in clay by pressing objects in or sculpting with tools. Next, the clay is painted with watercolor and covered with papier mâché, which lifts the color as it dries, absorbing it directly into the casting.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Cubist Portrait Bust

The first thing children learn when learning to draw a face or a figure is to view each part as a basic shape. This project approaches sculpture in the same way. Using geometric Styrofoam shapes, students build a bust or torso. The finished result resembles a simplified version of something you might have seen from Picasso or one of the other Cubist painters, only in three dimensions. This project is a good introduction to sculpture for young students.

K – 6

Deconstructed Books

There's more to "deconstructing" a book than just altering the pages. In this project, deconstructing means changing the object from a book to a sculpture. The tools are very basic — scissors, glue, paper punches and a desire to experiment!

3 – 12
Special Education

Shining Constructivism

Around the 1920s, a movement in modern art began in Russia as a group of artists began constructing sculpture for an industrialized world. As new technology produced strong, shining surfaces of glass, steel and plastic, Constructivists pioneered the use of modern, mechanical materials in art. This project weaves a variety of classroom-friendly “metals” — papers, foils and wires — into relief and three-dimensional art.

5 – 12

Stabile Sculpture

When one hears the name of Alexander Calder, the picture of kinetic hanging mobiles immediately comes to mind. These were only a portion of Calder’s vast body of work — he also painted and created stationary pieces called “stabiles.” Often, they resembled his mobiles — but without moving parts. In this lesson, students will create a “stabile” using Taskboard — a new, natural, wood-based medium used by architects and 3-D designers to create models.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Modern Figure Sculpture in the style of Alberto Giacometti

To create the gracefully haunting look of a Giacometti figure, this lesson plan introduces Paverpol™, a unique product that can be used with a variety of materials — textiles, paper, self-hardening clay, paper maché and more — to make sculptures so sturdy that they can be placed outdoors. It's non-toxic, safe for anyone to use and dries so quickly, you can make a sculpture in one day.

7 – 12

Architectural Letters

In this lesson plan, students design and construct a 3-dimensional letter using one of their initials. The surface can be decorated with descriptive words and images that are personally meaningful and unique to the student's identity. Instead of wet, messy adhesive, this process uses paper packing tape to create papier mâché. This tape is inexpensive, easy, and tidy to use, and the finished letters are hard and durable.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Rhythm in Layers

Low relief sculpture with design in mind. Layer by layer, piece by piece, this three-dimensional collage is assembled with repetitious shapes and elements, illustrating the principles of rhythm, balance and movement.

Watch the Video

3 – 12
Special Education

Flexible "Glass" Sculpture

Using flexible, translucent acrylic paint and soft, aluminum wire, students create abstract sculptures that can be formed and reformed. Addresses the design elements of form and shape. Displayed with a light source, they have the appearance of formed glass.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Textured Metal Boxes

This lesson plan combines the processes of repoussé and chasing to design a piece that looks as if it may have been crafted by an ancient silversmith. Objects are fixed to a cardboard box before the metal is applied so that the design is embossed into the metal in the style of repoussé. With tools, students then chase the metal around the objects to further define the texture.

Watch the Video

K – 12

Burlap Figures

Based on the sculpture of Polish artist Magdalena Abakanowicz, students create a 3-dimensional figure study in fiber.

Watch the Video

7 – 12

Bas Relief Paintings

Students will design and sculpt a dimensional piece of artwork, creating a variety of textures, lines and depths.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Assemblage Art

In this particular lesson plan, students will look closely at the work of Louise Nevelson, known for her abstract sculptures made from cast-off pieces of wood — actual street “throwaways” — uniformly coated with black or white spray paint. Students will create their own assemblages from wood pieces and other cast-off objects on a panel.

5 – 12

High Low Relief Sculpture

This High-Low Relief Sculpture is a variation on the popular three-dimensional pin sculpture toy that can be molded into familiar shapes as pressure is applied from underneath. These sculptures will be stationary with a few other variations, as students use their imaginations to create rolling landscapes, faces, flowers or other images out of different lengths of colorfully painted craft picks.

4 – 6

Junkanoo Headress

Junkanoo is a festival that takes place in the Bahamas. It is a tradition that traces its roots back to the 16th century. Music, dancing and elaborate costumes are all part of Junkanoo. This lesson introduces students to a fun and whimsical cultural event by allowing them to design their own headress - an important part of the festivities!

6 – 12

Environmental House

One of the principles of the Modern style of architecture is that the materials and functional requirements determine the design of the structure. Keeping that in mind, students will build a model of a home to function within a chosen environment.

7 – 12

Stained Glass Flowers

Wonderful, colorful flowers are created with a transparent, flexible paint called “Arti’Stick”. To link with botanical studies, have students study the anatomy of a flower, create and identify its parts.

3 – 8

Three Prisms

Math and science create visual forms and establish structure.“Three Prisms” uses equilateral triangles and parallelograms. The shapes are combined and repeated for a sculpture that makes additional equilateral triangles.

K – 8

Tie-Dye Shibori Vessel

The ancient Japanese tradition of textile painting known as Shibori entails many techniques and processes including the gathering, wrapping and binding methods that we call "tie-dye" today. This 2-part lesson involves painting and draping stiffened fabric to create a sculptural piece.

7 – 12

Wireform Figure Sculpture

In this lesson by Amaco, students will select a character in motion, such as a dancer, athlete or fairy, then capture and describe its movements through pose, form and balance. Flexible, easy-to-cut new WireForm™ Rods and WireForm™ mesh sheets make it easy to translate line from a flat design into a three-dimensional space.

5 – 12

Minimalist Sculpture

In order to understand Minimal Art, students must recognize what is absent. These painted chipboard constructions are abstract with a minimum amount of color, value, shape and texture.

5 – 12

Mythical Beasts

Students create a character — half human, half animal — write a story and build a paper maché sculpture of their creation.

5 – 12

Inuit Bear Carving

The single most represented subject in North American Arctic art and legend is the polar bear. Easy-to-carve foam can be used to resemble soapstone sculptures.

5 – 8

Free Form Vessel

Using a balloon and coffee can base, create a sturdy vessel with Sculptamold compound. Finished pieces can be painted and embellished with mosaics and collage matierals.

5 – 12

Faux Fossil Fun

Experience an archeological dig, right in your own classroom! Students create fossils the way that nature does - by making impressions and filling them

K – 12

Figurative Slot Sculpture

This project requires students to work with the same issues confronted by professional sculptors, working in the round, the work being understandable to the viewer, and structural stability.

5 – 8

Stylized Cone Icons

Using the example of a suspension bridge, students plan and create a sculpture focused on balance, stability and strength. Foamboard with colorful wire provides a blending of aesthetics and function.

5 – 12

Gelly Bowls

Dimensional collage using wire mesh and acrylic gel medium. Develop color, texture and design with paint, photocopies, images, music, text, colorful papers and many different objects inside the transaprent gel. Once dry, the form can be easily manipulated into a bowl.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Lazertran Metal Sculpture

This process takes any computer image and turns it into a 3-dimensional sculpture.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Martin Puryear-Inspired Basketry

Students learn the importance of negative space while creating a non-traditional basket by focusing on it as a sculptural element rather than a functional object. Being a non-representational form, these abstract baskets draw attention to volume and space and redefine what a basket is intended for.

3 – 12

Paper Dishes

These papier mâché dishes are an example of utilitarian items that can also be used as décor.

3 – 8

Primitive Semi-Flat Dolls

There is a rich history in dollmaking techniques throughout the centuries. These soft dolls are painted, stuffed and glued together — so the construction is easy and safe.

4 – 6

Simple Pate de Verre

Translated to “glass paste,” the French term Pate de Verre refers to a glass vessel kiln-fired in a mold. This lesson shows how to make a simple one-part mold and glass casting.

5 – 12

Wind Catchers

This step-by-step project from Mayco Colors demonstrates how to make insect-themed Wind Catchers from bisqueware pieces.

3 – 8

3D Contour Collage

Students create a dimensional line drawing out of flexible wire then cover it with assorted papers and tissues for a whimsical, lightweight sculpture.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

American Pie

A “slice” of American Culture! Students design a clay pie piece piled high with symbols, icons and representations of their favorite things.

5 – 12

Animal Masks

From Mayco Colors, this lesson gives students the opportunity to explore the history and function of masks in various cultures and times. Students will be able to learn and master basic hand building and sculpting techniques using either self-hardening clay or clay requiring kiln firing.

K – 6

Bones

A full skeleton illustrates movement during a wide range of activities. The addition of a background turns this project into a more complete artwork.

3 – 6

Classroom Chihuly

Give students an opportunity to enjoy creating random organic forms with color and transparency similar to actual glass.

Watch the Video

2 – 12

Egyptian Relief Sculpture by Amaco

Students should research hieroglyphs and find a hieroglyphic symbol that has meaning to them. They might choose their initial as a their symbol, or create a figure in the style of an Egyptian Queen or Pharaoh.

4 – 6

Tissue Topiary

Topiary is the art of turning living plants into sculptures that are constantly growing and changing — a form of landscape art. In this project, an art topiary is made of a wire base, green tissue paper and twine. Although this Tissue Topiary will require some initial sculpting, no care will be needed after construction!

4 – 12

2009 Totems

Students create a modern-day totem pole with hand-formed clay animals positioned on a wooden dowel.

5 – 8

Kinetic Dura-Lar Sculpture

This lesson will attract students to the abstract as they create their own hanging kinetic sculptures from lightweight polyester material.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

click to collapse

Grades 9 – 12

 

Grade Level

NEW! Circle Wall Sculpture

The circle has played a role in the art of every culture, often symbolizing unity and completeness. This simple reed-and-paper design demonstrates how balance, emphasis, patterns, rhythm, movement, and unity produce integrality in a piece of visual art.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

NEW! “Mama” Spider Sculptures

Created as an ode to her mother, one of the largest sculptures in the world is Louise Bourgeois’ “Maman.” — a bronze spider that stands 30 feet tall. These wire and tissue versions assume natural, and sometimes even creepy, poses!

Watch the Video

3 – 12

NEW! Beastly Bobblehead

Create a whimsical patterned Bobble Head! The “body” is a clay slab that students texturize by pressing interesting pasta shapes into it. Top with a pinch-pot head — and learn a lesson in balance.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

NEW! Shoe Shrine

Make a sculptural shrine from an outgrown or second-hand shoe! Primed with modeling paste, covered with ornate embellishments, and then aligned vertically, an everyday shoe can become a dramatic backdrop for relics that represent a student’s favorite thing, place, idea, or event.

3 – 12

Steampunk Entomology

Create a futuristic insect specimen using clay, discarded metal pieces, and wire. Make an air dry clay body, push wire legs, antennae and steampunk embellishments into the soft clay, add wings and let dry to harden! Embellish with paints, if desired.

Watch the Video

K – 12

Wire Art Quilt

A decorative, sculptural interpretation of the Friendship Quilt. Wire is an amazing art medium — it can be bent to form a variety of lines, shapes, letters, and images, outlining patterns in the way that individual pieces of fabric make up each square in a traditional quilt. Elementary-age students can work easily with chenille stems and colorful plastic-coated wire while older students will create art with soft steel, aluminum, and copper wire

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Butterfield Horse

Construct a high-relief horse using Activa Fast Mache and found objects. Combine a painted and collaged background with a horse made of quick mache, sticks, pine needles, leaves, and shredded papers in the style of Debra Butterfield.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Convertible “Canned” Sculpture

Composition — the way the elements of a piece of art are arranged and relate to each other — can be difficult to grasp. This lesson plan presents an easy, forgiving way to see the effects of composition while using the dimensional works of Frank Stella as an example. The sculpture is assembled with magnets on a metal can so it can be taken apart and rearranged to see how the composition is affected — what works and what doesn’t.

3 – 12

Flower Garden Tiles

Easily make flower tiles by carving clay, filling with plaster, and finishing with liquid watercolors.

Watch the Video

K – 12

Coral Reef Creation

Brilliantly replicate thousands of years of oceanic evolution in just a few hours. Using clay, paint, and pearlescent mixing medium, along with handmade clay stamps, create a beautiful coral sculpture.

K – 12

Dancing Houses

Part cartoonist and part Picasso, the art of Brooklyn-born James Rizzi is highly recognizable. His playful, brilliant images created a style he described as “Urban Primitive.” Students will enjoy making a classroom cityscape of fun and fabulous construction paper buildings. A simple wire armature beneath allows the structure to be playfully positioned -— almost as if it were dancing. This project provides a lesson in movement as design principle.

Watch the Video

K – 9

Ancient Bas-Relief Casting

Create an ancient "carving" using cast paper and blasa foam!

5 – 12

Art-O-Motion 2

Sculptor George Rickey used scientific precision and physics, functioning with wind to construct heavy steel sculptures that seemed to defy gravity and float on air. In this lesson, students create a simple sculpture around a rotary hub with stacked wooden beads and soft wire. When a direct air current is applied to metallic paper “sails” (blow on it!), the sculpture blades turn gently.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

ArtStraw Architecture

Skyscrapers evolved from the inside out — as steel frames became stronger, windows and walls became lighter, like a “skin.” Students can construct high-rise buildings (or low-rise designs) that are extremely light and open — they're made with paper straws and corrugated plastic joints (no glue required). Imagination grows with the construction — higher and higher!

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Many Metals “Day of the Dead” Triptych

Celebrate a happy and colorful Mexican tradition with many metals! Using the skull as a symbol of rebirth, create a triptych with embossed metal, papier mâché, and lots of color and sparkle!

Watch the Video

5 – 12

New Guinean “Plant Paste” Doll

Make a hand-built ritual doll with only three simple materials! Knead together clay, instant papier mâché and burlap fibers to create an intriguing art doll. Add body paint and embellish by adding seed bead teeth, a shell necklace, or clothing made of burlap.

4 – 12

Textural Glass Slumping

Create a textured clay mold to use again and again! Carve a design into a slab and bisque fire it. After coating it with kiln wash, this mold can be used many times to impart unique textures to slumped glass pieces.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

African Clay Boxes

By making an animal shaped box out of clay, students honor both the vast diversity of Africa’s animal world, and also create a functional work of art! After choosing a favorite African animal, students will hand build a clay box with lid.

5 – 12

Rolly Bowls

Glazing isn't the only way to create beautiful surfaces! Agateware pottery features swirling marbelized colors and was probably first developed to imitate the qualities of agate, a semiprecious stone with striated patterning. These swirling effects can be created by working with thin slabs of colored clay that has been layered to create patterns. This technique allows for both precise patterns and free, random effects.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Venetian Volto Mask

The Italian word “volto” translates as “face”. These full-face masks were known as “citizen’s masks” because they were originally worn by common people during the Carnival of Venice. By draping acrylic felt over a reusable form and using Rice Paste (a gluten-free maché alternative) to stiffen, students create a sculptural mask that can be decorated with paint, glitter, feathers, rhinestones, etc.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

“Art-O-Motion” Mechanical Sculpture

In 1913, Marcel DuChamp mounted a spinning bicycle wheel to a stool to make what is considered the first kinetic sculpture. Since then, many artists have paired physical science and engineering with artistic vision to create amazing pieces of mechanical sculpture. This simple, pulley-operated design has students design “gears” that spin on spools when a string is pulled.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Watercolor Texture Casts

Molding, casting, sculpting, painting and monoprinting — this simple project pulls all of these together into one low-relief sculpture that demonstrates the elements of texture and color. Texture is defined in clay by pressing objects in or sculpting with tools. Next, the clay is painted with watercolor and covered with papier mâché, which lifts the color as it dries, absorbing it directly into the casting.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Deconstructed Books

There's more to "deconstructing" a book than just altering the pages. In this project, deconstructing means changing the object from a book to a sculpture. The tools are very basic — scissors, glue, paper punches and a desire to experiment!

3 – 12
Special Education

Shining Constructivism

Around the 1920s, a movement in modern art began in Russia as a group of artists began constructing sculpture for an industrialized world. As new technology produced strong, shining surfaces of glass, steel and plastic, Constructivists pioneered the use of modern, mechanical materials in art. This project weaves a variety of classroom-friendly “metals” — papers, foils and wires — into relief and three-dimensional art.

5 – 12

Stabile Sculpture

When one hears the name of Alexander Calder, the picture of kinetic hanging mobiles immediately comes to mind. These were only a portion of Calder’s vast body of work — he also painted and created stationary pieces called “stabiles.” Often, they resembled his mobiles — but without moving parts. In this lesson, students will create a “stabile” using Taskboard — a new, natural, wood-based medium used by architects and 3-D designers to create models.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Modern Figure Sculpture in the style of Alberto Giacometti

To create the gracefully haunting look of a Giacometti figure, this lesson plan introduces Paverpol™, a unique product that can be used with a variety of materials — textiles, paper, self-hardening clay, paper maché and more — to make sculptures so sturdy that they can be placed outdoors. It's non-toxic, safe for anyone to use and dries so quickly, you can make a sculpture in one day.

7 – 12

Architectural Letters

In this lesson plan, students design and construct a 3-dimensional letter using one of their initials. The surface can be decorated with descriptive words and images that are personally meaningful and unique to the student's identity. Instead of wet, messy adhesive, this process uses paper packing tape to create papier mâché. This tape is inexpensive, easy, and tidy to use, and the finished letters are hard and durable.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

Rhythm in Layers

Low relief sculpture with design in mind. Layer by layer, piece by piece, this three-dimensional collage is assembled with repetitious shapes and elements, illustrating the principles of rhythm, balance and movement.

Watch the Video

3 – 12
Special Education

Flexible "Glass" Sculpture

Using flexible, translucent acrylic paint and soft, aluminum wire, students create abstract sculptures that can be formed and reformed. Addresses the design elements of form and shape. Displayed with a light source, they have the appearance of formed glass.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Textured Metal Boxes

This lesson plan combines the processes of repoussé and chasing to design a piece that looks as if it may have been crafted by an ancient silversmith. Objects are fixed to a cardboard box before the metal is applied so that the design is embossed into the metal in the style of repoussé. With tools, students then chase the metal around the objects to further define the texture.

Watch the Video

K – 12

Burlap Figures

Based on the sculpture of Polish artist Magdalena Abakanowicz, students create a 3-dimensional figure study in fiber.

Watch the Video

7 – 12

Bas Relief Paintings

Students will design and sculpt a dimensional piece of artwork, creating a variety of textures, lines and depths.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Assemblage Art

In this particular lesson plan, students will look closely at the work of Louise Nevelson, known for her abstract sculptures made from cast-off pieces of wood — actual street “throwaways” — uniformly coated with black or white spray paint. Students will create their own assemblages from wood pieces and other cast-off objects on a panel.

5 – 12

Drop Ring Glass Slumping

The drop ring glass slumping process is an advanced technique that produces an endless array of dramatic shapes and effects. This is achieved by leaving the center part of a glass piece unsupported during the firing process, allowing the center of the glass to sag or “slump” into the open space below it.

9 – 12

Junkanoo Headress

Junkanoo is a festival that takes place in the Bahamas. It is a tradition that traces its roots back to the 16th century. Music, dancing and elaborate costumes are all part of Junkanoo. This lesson introduces students to a fun and whimsical cultural event by allowing them to design their own headress - an important part of the festivities!

6 – 12

Wire Weave

Students construct a metal wire and mesh woven relief sculpture. A unique approach to weaving, students overlap wire mesh, practice sewing techniques without a needle and create a mixed media collage.

9 – 12

Environmental House

One of the principles of the Modern style of architecture is that the materials and functional requirements determine the design of the structure. Keeping that in mind, students will build a model of a home to function within a chosen environment.

7 – 12

Tie-Dye Shibori Vessel

The ancient Japanese tradition of textile painting known as Shibori entails many techniques and processes including the gathering, wrapping and binding methods that we call "tie-dye" today. This 2-part lesson involves painting and draping stiffened fabric to create a sculptural piece.

7 – 12

Wireform Figure Sculpture

In this lesson by Amaco, students will select a character in motion, such as a dancer, athlete or fairy, then capture and describe its movements through pose, form and balance. Flexible, easy-to-cut new WireForm™ Rods and WireForm™ mesh sheets make it easy to translate line from a flat design into a three-dimensional space.

5 – 12

Minimalist Sculpture

In order to understand Minimal Art, students must recognize what is absent. These painted chipboard constructions are abstract with a minimum amount of color, value, shape and texture.

5 – 12

Mythical Beasts

Students create a character — half human, half animal — write a story and build a paper maché sculpture of their creation.

5 – 12

Free Form Vessel

Using a balloon and coffee can base, create a sturdy vessel with Sculptamold compound. Finished pieces can be painted and embellished with mosaics and collage matierals.

5 – 12

Faux Fossil Fun

Experience an archeological dig, right in your own classroom! Students create fossils the way that nature does - by making impressions and filling them

K – 12

Copper Metal Box

Students are eager to develop artwork unique in terms of creating personnal interpretation of aesthetics. This metal box project stresses the effective use of organizational principals.

9 – 12

Stylized Cone Icons

Using the example of a suspension bridge, students plan and create a sculpture focused on balance, stability and strength. Foamboard with colorful wire provides a blending of aesthetics and function.

5 – 12

Cable Sculpture

Using the example of a suspension bridge, students plan and create a sculpture focused on balance, stability and strength. Foamboard with colorful wire provides a blending of aesthetics and function.

9 – 12

Gelly Bowls

Dimensional collage using wire mesh and acrylic gel medium. Develop color, texture and design with paint, photocopies, images, music, text, colorful papers and many different objects inside the transaprent gel. Once dry, the form can be easily manipulated into a bowl.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Lazertran Metal Sculpture

This process takes any computer image and turns it into a 3-dimensional sculpture.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Martin Puryear-Inspired Basketry

Students learn the importance of negative space while creating a non-traditional basket by focusing on it as a sculptural element rather than a functional object. Being a non-representational form, these abstract baskets draw attention to volume and space and redefine what a basket is intended for.

3 – 12

Simple Pate de Verre

Translated to “glass paste,” the French term Pate de Verre refers to a glass vessel kiln-fired in a mold. This lesson shows how to make a simple one-part mold and glass casting.

5 – 12

Slab Clay Figure

Students create a figure while interpreting a culture's economic and social development.

9 – 12

3D Contour Collage

Students create a dimensional line drawing out of flexible wire then cover it with assorted papers and tissues for a whimsical, lightweight sculpture.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Abstract Planes in a Paper Sculpture

Students will create a small scale model that will teach them to design a free-standing object considering both structural and design components

9 – 12

American Pie

A “slice” of American Culture! Students design a clay pie piece piled high with symbols, icons and representations of their favorite things.

5 – 12

Classroom Chihuly

Give students an opportunity to enjoy creating random organic forms with color and transparency similar to actual glass.

Watch the Video

2 – 12

Tissue Topiary

Topiary is the art of turning living plants into sculptures that are constantly growing and changing — a form of landscape art. In this project, an art topiary is made of a wire base, green tissue paper and twine. Although this Tissue Topiary will require some initial sculpting, no care will be needed after construction!

4 – 12

Kinetic Dura-Lar Sculpture

This lesson will attract students to the abstract as they create their own hanging kinetic sculptures from lightweight polyester material.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

click to collapse

Special Education

 

Grade Level

NEW! Make a Fake Cake!

Using the paintings of Wayne Thiebaud as inspiration, students prepare visually delightful, deliciously decorated sculptural cupcakes using a new, voluminous finger paint that spreads like frosting, yet dries to a strong, durable finish.

Watch the Video

K – 8
Special Education

Deconstructed Books

There's more to "deconstructing" a book than just altering the pages. In this project, deconstructing means changing the object from a book to a sculpture. The tools are very basic — scissors, glue, paper punches and a desire to experiment!

3 – 12
Special Education

Rhythm in Layers

Low relief sculpture with design in mind. Layer by layer, piece by piece, this three-dimensional collage is assembled with repetitious shapes and elements, illustrating the principles of rhythm, balance and movement.

Watch the Video

3 – 12
Special Education

  • Dick Blick Art Materials
  • ·
  • P.O. Box 1267
  • ·
  • Galesburg, IL 61402-1267
  • ·
  • Toll-free Phone (800) 828-4548

  • International Phone +1-309-343-6181 ext. 5402
  • ·
  • Fax (800) 621-8293

Dick Blick Art Materials®, Blick®, Blick Studio®, and Artists Pick Blick® are registered trademarks of Dick Blick Holdings Inc. © Copyright 1999-2014 Dick Blick Holdings Inc. All rights reserved.

page request took 1.3053 seconds for dmzwbp5 to process ...