Lesson Plans by Discipline - 2 Dimensional


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Grades K – 4

 

Grade Level

NEW! Matisse Prints du Soleil

Henri Matisse survived cancer to find a renewed energy and expressionism in artworks he called “scissor paintings.” Inspired by his cut-paper shapes, students can use sunlight or an artificial source to create color-saturated prints on fabric or paper.

K – 12
Special Education

NEW! “Selfies” (exactly where I want to be)

Creating self portraits is a snap with this easy technique! Facial proportions and features are traced onto clear film, then layered over a background of a student’s own choosing — a location where she or he would most like to take a “selfie.”

K – 8

NEW! Torn Metal Collage

Inspired by Byzantine mosaics and tapestries, Austrian artist Gustav Klimt was acclaimed for his gilded paintings. Students use metallic paper to create their own opulent artwork, which is then gently embossed and “antiqued” with tempera.

3 – 12
Special Education

NEW! Black Velvet Mystery Painting

Applying oil pastels to black rayon fabric makes a striking composition, but when students add UV paint and a black light, the finished paintings really glow.

K – 12

NEW! Curtain of Leaves Monoprint

Many artists have used trees as an inspiration for their work. Pressed leaves and texture tools are used to make one-of-a-kind, double-sided monoprints. Using a flexible printing block as a plate makes it easy!

3 – 12

NEW! Shibori Kimono

Experiment with Japanese paper-dyeing techniques using traditional rice papers, then share papers to create simple origami kimonos. The result is a stunning combination of art and culture.

3 – 12

NEW! Simple Silk Screen in the Round

Silk screening is made simple with the use of an embroidery hoop frame and Mod Podge! Simply draw an image on silk screen fabric with a pencil and paint around the outside with Mod Podge. Pull fabric ink though with a squeegee and you're done! Add handpainted details to add even more color.

2 – 12

NEW! Wayang Kulit Shadow Puppetry

Tell a story through a traditional Indonesian shadow puppet play! Make a puppet that looks like leather by dampening and crinkling black cardstock, then create interesting patterns with paper punches. Finish with metallic markers and glue to dowels!

K – 12

Anaglyph Artistry

Make a composition for viewing with 3-D glasses! Turn an original drawing into a three-dimensional anaglyph using red and blue transfer paper with red and blue markers. Then, make the 3-D glasses necessary to make it pop!

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2 – 12

Artist’s Challenge Coins (ACC’s)

Challenge Coins are specially designed and minted for service personnel to recognize an achievement, enhance morale, or to signify membership in (or experience on) a particular mission. Create a personal Artist's Challenge Coin (ACC) by making a small print, collage, stamp, or photo appliqué one side of a coin-shaped wooden disk, and a challenge or message on the reverse.

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K – 12
Special Education

Decalcomania: Glue Paint Symmetry Prints

“Decalcomania” was a techique was used by Surrealists to create impromptu paintings controlled largely by chance. Much like a Rorschach Ink-Blot test, they would search for hidden imagery and develop it into a finished painting. This tidy and highly interactive process uses Glue Paint in a finger painting-style of application — without actually touching it. Looking for hidden images and contour lines in the print will fuel the imagination of a young Surrealist!

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K – 12
Special Education

Lessons on Lascaux

Create a cave wall that crackles with authenticity! Using a paste made with powdered tempera and a Dura-Lar stencil, make a beautiful 3-D cave creation.

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3 – 12

Muslin Masterpiece

Create a beautiful textile design using dye sticks and block printing.

K – 12

The Secret Life of your Pet!

Disquise your pet or favorite animal in a fantasy environment with easy photo manipulation.

K – 12

Easy-Outline Botanical Illustration Prints

Although photography and modern printing processes have replaced the need for cataloguing plant life with detailed drawn and painted illustrations, botanical illustration is still a beloved art. To make an accurate rendering of a plant, students can create an impression in plaster, then trace the shape and details with colored pencil, ink, or watercolor. Mixing and shading for color accuracy and identifying the plant are some of the skills that will be learned in this exercise.

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K – 12

“Gawu” — African Inspired Tapestry

Ghana-born artist El Anatsui is known internationally for his large-scale sculptures called “Gawu,” a composite of the words “ga,” meaning something made of metal and 'wu,” meaning a fashioned garment. In this lesson, students create their own tapestries as a response to El Anatsui's art, using African kente to discover rhythm and pattern in art. Recycled materials can be used, including folded papers and labels.

K – 12
Special Education

Glue Paint Symmetry Prints

Finger Painting has never been so fun — or so very tidy! This project incorporates glue paint — basic white glue tinted with any shade of watercolor. It dries with a beautiful transparency that is enhanced when applied to a clear sheet. When the sheet is folded, the colors can be blended and moved about the page, without actually touching it!

K – 12
Special Education

Burroughs on Burlap

Printmaking on burlap results in a beaufitul rusticity.

3 – 12

Color Field Sketchbook

Stain painting was a successful technique employed by Color Field artists Helen Frankenthaler and Morris Louis. They poured diluted acrylic color over large canvases to form “veils” of brilliant color. In this lesson, students will first learn a simple process for creating their own drawing pad, then stain and design a canvas cover for it.

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3 – 12

“Nesting” with Wool

Roll up a felted masterpiece! Students easily create beautiful wool paintings using soap, water, and a little elbow grease.

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K – 12

Prairie-Style Stained Glass Clings

Frank Lloyd Wright referred to his stained glass windows as “light screens” because they interacted with the view behind them, rather than covering or obscuring it. Here, students use geometry and repeating patterns to create a vinyl window cling that incorporates the ideals of Prairie-Style Design.

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K – 12

White on White Collagraph

Printmaking — starring textures and shapes! A collagraph printing plate is created on a canvas panel using textures found in the classroom, textured gel mediums, or even textures from nature! After a final coat of gel medium is applied, the plate and paper are run through a printing press.

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3 – 12

Sumi-e Resist Painting

NOTE! The liquid wax used in this lesson plan is now tinted green. Artwork produced using this process will not look like the examples shown. Practice the ancient art of sumi-e painting with a modern twist! Paint with diluted wax resist, then reveal your masterpiece by applying black sumi-e ink over the top. The addition of watercolor gives the painting even more interest.

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K – 12

Sheepish Composition

This lesson plan introduces wool roving, which is the raw, washed wool from the sheep that is then dyed a variety of beautiful colors. The wool strands will be used to "paint" onto a canvas of felt. The wool is very easily "felted" or punched into the background with a felting needle.

K – 12

Changing Faces

With this fun project, facial features become puzzle pieces that can be changed over and over again. It's a light and humorous way to examine the endless variety found in human faces and skin tones.

K – 8

Eye-Popping Paper Curls

Quilling is also known as paper filligree, paper rolling, mosaic or paper folding (even though the paper is really curled). In this project, students will try their hand at quilling in a truly sculptural way. By using much larger, thicker strips of paper, the finished product "pops" out in a very optical way. By using black on white, the effect is even further emphasized.

3 – 12

Paper Memory Quilt

The stitching together of layers of padding and fabric may date as far back as ancient Egypt. In America, quilt-making was common beginning in the late 18th century. A paper memory quilt is a fun way to keep ephemera (paper items) that have significance. This project will teach important design skills as pieces of paper are cut apart and reassembled. Insight into pattern, rhythm and repetition is gained.

2 – 12

String Painting

Inspired by Huichol Nierikas — beautiful paintings made from yarn pressed onto beeswax — this is a simple way for students to experience the color, geometric linework and symbolism of this Native American art form. Using colorful string applied to an adhesive-backed piece of felt, students create their designs without messy glue or sharp cutting tools.

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3 – 12

Tibetan Wishing Banner

Tibetan wish or prayer flags traditionally are used to promote peace, compassion, strength and wisdom. Tibetans do not believe that the flags carry prayers to the gods, but rather that their messages and wishes will be blown by the wind to spread goodwill and compassion into all-pervading space. In this project, students will use a liquid wax resist that will be painted onto silk rectangles and need not be removed. Vibrant color and a final gold embellishment finish the piece.

2 – 12

WonderFoam Collagraph Prints

WonderFoam is familiar to almost everyone who has ever presented a craft project to children — but, if you'd like to move beyond the "foamies" to a real art technique, incorporate WonderFoam into printmaking! “Collagraph” is a process in which materials are arranged collage-style on a rigid surface, coated with tempera paint and then transferred to paper. Students learn to make repeating patterns with shapes.

K – 6
Special Education

Byzantine Medallions

The wealthy Byzantine Empire had a huge influence on personal ornamentation. Characterized by extensive iconography, pendants and medallions were widely produced to denote faith, office or rank. For this project, students use air-dry clay and colorful rhinestones to create their own Byzantine-style medallions. Gilded with gold powder and finished with a gloss coating, they can be used as ornaments or placed outdoors as mini stepping stones.

K – 12

Impressionistic Marker Painting

You won't believe what these markers can do! The juicy, alcohol-based ink reacts with itself or with hand-sanitizer to make painterly drawings on clear plastic film.

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3 – 12

Acrylic “Skins”

This project utilizes acrylic paint, but in a totally unique way...dried! Acrylic paint "skins" are easily created just by brushing paint on a non-stick palette or baker's parchment and letting it dry. You can use this plastic, flexible paint in a number of ways to create mosaics, mixed media collage, stained glass-like effects, jewelry, book covers and more!

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K – 12

Monotype Hoop-La

Functioning as both a painting and a print, a Monotype is unique and irreproducible. The “hoop-la” over Monotype can be experienced in your classroom with this simplified, safely water-based process using acrylic paint, printing foam and fabric. The technique builds the print a layer at a time and tools are used to remove or “subtract” color between layers. Stretch the finished print ona gold macramé ring for an instant frame.

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3 – 12

Fantastic Faux Fossils

Students create their own “fossil bed” by modeling three-dimensional shapes of animals, plants or insects, then “burying” them beneath layers of tissue paper. Add earth-tone pastels to make them look as if they just came from an excavation site.

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K – 12

Illuminated Initials

The practice of illumination — decoration of pages with ornate lettering, luminous color and precious metals, was developed during the middle ages when literacy was rare and books were even more so. With this process, students design one of their own initials on reflective board and add transparent color — it appears to glow with reflective light from within.

3 – 8

Egg-stra Easy Watercolor “Crunch”

Traditionally, eggshell mosaics are made by first dying then positioning each shard individually — a time-consuming and delicate process. This project introduces a new way to crush and color eggshells, creating intricate veining and texture all at once without pre-dying or arranging each fragment. The simple glue-and-paint process and satisfying “crunch!” of breaking eggshells will delight children of all ages and skill levels.

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K – 12
Special Education

Thematic Clay Picture Frames

A lesson plan from AMACO®. Students select their favorite photo and design a custom picture frame to display it. After the bisque firing, the picture frames will be painted and decorated using the new AMACO® Teacher's Choice and Teacher's Palette low-fire glazes.

K – 6

Peace Windows: in the style of Marc Chagall’s stained glass

Late in his career, artist Marc Chagall produced a number of paintings in glass with colorful, dream-like images symbolizing peace, love, tolerance and faith. In reality, Marc Chagall’s life was filled with tragic events and the world he lived in was anything but peaceful. In light of this fact, students can begin to understand an artist’s ability to share healing, inspiration and encouragement, using “peace” as a theme.

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K – 8
Special Education

“Print & Go” T-Shirts

Printing creative T-shirts and fabrics doesn’t always require stencils and screens — students can easily design their own giant stamps and paint them any way they want. Even if each shirt displays the same message, each will be a completely unique work of art! This process is perfect for group settings — schools, camps, daycare centers, clubs, family reunions and special events — but it is also ideal for countless home decorating and craft projects.

K – 8
Special Education

Stencil a Painting

Stencils and repeated patterns have been used in painting as long ago as 9,000 years, when early humans placed their hands against cave walls and outlined them in charcoal or paint. In this lesson, even a stencil made of basic shapes can be effective. Each stencil can be used repeatedly, and by changing oil pastel color, overlapping images, or using only a part of an image, the result is a cohesive composition that has depth and color fusion.

4 – 12

Watercolor Texture Casts

Molding, casting, sculpting, painting and monoprinting — this simple project pulls all of these together into one low-relief sculpture that demonstrates the elements of texture and color. Texture is defined in clay by pressing objects in or sculpting with tools. Next, the clay is painted with watercolor and covered with papier mâché, which lifts the color as it dries, absorbing it directly into the casting.

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3 – 12

Color Scramble

In the 1960’s, Frank Stella became known for his minimal geometric paintings of concentric squares that used color to create visual movement. Each concentric square of color related to the next, whether they were harmonic or contrasting colors. In this lesson plan, students consider color relations and “paint” a Stella-style work with colored masking tape,

4 – 12

Graffiti Fun Art

Encourage students to design a personal and stylized signature or “tag.” The tag can be a given name, a nickname or something they’ve made up to represent themselves. This school version of graffiti shows students that lettering is not only important in communicating, but that it can also be an artistic expression.

1 – 6

Itajime Decorative Paper

Itajime Shibori is a technique for folding, clamping and dyeing paper or fabric resulting in beautiful designs – very similar to tie-dye. The folds and clamps keep the dye or ink from penetrating fully in certain areas making patterns and giving a dimensional appearance on a flat surface. This project is a great way to teach students the scientific concept of diffusion and color mixing.

3 – 12

Master Palettes

Drawing on the reverse side of a matte sheet of acetate, students create “windows” into the work of a chosen artist, using similar colors, subject matter and style to describe the artist’s focus. See if the class can guess which artists are represented on each student’s “palette.”

K – 6

On the Wall Motifs

Students select a commercial business and consider images, symbols and colors that will best represent the company. The repeated “wallpaper” patterns are made with a stamp designed and carved by the students. This fun project will help children understand how simple images communicate a message, whether in business or elsewhere.

4 – 6

Chenille Stem Stitchery

Spanish painter Joan Miró is known for his playful art. Although he was a world renowned artist, his work gives the impression it could have been created by a child. Miró was interested in reducing characters to their simplest forms and using very basic, bright colors. He felt some of the best ideas were inspired by the simplest things. In this project, students attach and weave Chenille Stems onto stitchery canvas to make simple shapes and designs.

K – 6
Special Education

Drapo Dazzle

Inspired by the sequinned banners of Haiti, students will make a banner of their own design using a variety of glittery, sparkly, shiny materials and brilliant colors. Use this opportunity to learn about the art and history of Haiti, a unique blend of African, French, Spanish and Native Caribbean cultures.

K – 8

Making Elemental Drawing Materials

Blick Art Materials was not around to provide art supplies 32,000 years ago, but, somehow, the earliest humans found a way to draw and paint on cave walls using materials made from basic elements all around them. Similar to the Paleolithic era, students will make their own drawing tools by transforming simple materials from the classroom, and then using them to communicate through images.

K – 12

No-Fire Nouveau Tiles

Beginning in the early 1880s, the “Art Nouveau” style flourished in all forms of art. Beautiful pottery was mass-produced during this era, especially in the form of decorative tiles. Tube lining — a technique in which a design outline was created first and then filled in with color — is the definitive look of Art Nouveau. If kiln-glazed ceramics are not an option for your environment, this project is a way to produce glossy, hand-painted tiles that look like the real thing.

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K – 8
10 – 12
Special Education

Altered Penny Carpet

In the 1800s, many homes were decorated with “Penny Carpets”, made from miss-matched fabric cut into circles by tracing around a penny. Patches were then layered and stitched together to make a large piece. Students create a Penny Carpet with fabric that they design themselves using monoprinting techniques and fabric paint. Each section is sewed to felt swatches, then joined to make a larger piece of art.

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3 – 12

EZ Grout Mosaics

Students of all ages can mimic mosaic artisans throughout history with these easy tile-making and “grouting” techniques. Clay tiles are glued to a firm backboard and grouted with acrylic paint. This project is safe and simple enough for younger students and those with special needs.

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K – 12
Special Education

Metal Magic Journals

The magic is in the color! Wax Pastels adhere to the slick surface of tooling foil and stay there. Students explore tools and texture plates to create designs in lightweight metal, then, using simple page-binding techniques, assemble a lovely hardcover book to use for notes, sketches, journaling, scrapbooking or photos.

3 – 8

Middle East Reflections

Geometric patterns occur in rich profusion throughout Islamic Cultures. This lesson is an invitation to look at the history and meaning behind patterns and view the work of a contemporary Iranian artist. Students design and assemble a reflective mosaic pattern using metallic papers on adhesive film. Easy and tidy...no glue!

K – 12

Quilt Block Collage

What we think of as “quilts” today — pieces of fabric sewn together to form blocks that collectively make a whole — did not become popular until the mid 19th century. Making quilts was a means of “recycling” fabric from clothing that was no longer usable. In this lesson plan, students make a quilt block using paper and glue rather than fabric and stitching. It’s a great way to recycle materials and illustrate a number of design principles — rhythm, pattern, balance and unity.

3 – 12

Painted Story Quilt

Quilt-making spans multiple centuries and cultures. It can teach math skills, record history, recycle cast-off materials and encourage cooperative efforts within a group...just for a few ideas! This lesson looks at the story quilts of Faith Ringgold. She surrounds her narrative paintings with a quilted border, creating stories in color, texture, and pattern. Students select their own story to illustrate, then paint fabric using watersoluble pastels and watercolor.

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K – 12
Special Education

"Diaper Wipe" Diffusion

This project demonstrates the physical process of osmosis. Water-based markers are diluted by filtering water through an ordinary wet wipe. The flow of the color is slowed and channeled by the presence of oil and alchohol in the wipe, creating random and interesting tie-dye-type patterns. Educational...and really fun to watch!

K – 5
Special Education

Earth Strata

The inside of the Earth holds hidden secrets very close to us, so dig a hole to uncover layers of mystery! A hole just 1" deep will show a very small example of soil strata or layers – including rocks, shells, fossils, geodes, water, oil and coal. This art project is based on geology but need not be scientifically accurate as students creatively incorporate texture and line.

1 – 6

Persian and Navajo Rug Bookmarks

This lesson plan explains two diverse and beautiful style of textiles: Persian carpets and Navajo rugs. Similar colors and geometric shapes are two common elements of both.

4 – 8

Photo Tinting

Turn a black and white photo into a "riot" of color! Tinting is a simple technique that challenges students of all ages to pay attention to detail, and even young children can do it with success. In this project, class pictures are enlarged, printed in black-and-white and tinted. The use of non-traditional colors is encouraged.

K – 6

"Rapper" Art

Collect and recycle product wrappers for a "green" art project worthy of good-citizen attention! Students save and trade wrappers to make a paper background, then choose words and phrases related to their "rapper" collage and cut them from thin foam to create a printing plate. "Rapper" Art is an easy process for making posters, book covers and signs in multiples.

K – 6

Souper Art

This is a whimsical introduction to nutrition and graphic design that invites students to make up an imaginary soup. National studies indicate that children eat about anything if the advertising is "crazy" or attractive to them, including vitamins and vegetables. Now its students' turn to entice peers to "buy" their soup! Anyone for Alligator Soup?

K – 6

Burlap Pastel Painting

This easily constructed project offers an exploration of texture, line and color – key elements of design. Younger children may take a more abstract approach with emphasis on texture and color. Older students will find the burlap easy to pull and the weave easy to manipulate, creating holes and lines. Subject matter such as buildings, landscapes and abstract designs are adaptable to varying grade levels.

K – 6

Color Twist Game

This game puts a new "twist" on an old favorite, and provides an enjoyable way for students to learn color-mixing.

K – 4

Plantable Pulp Cards

This is a great project for teaching recycling and renewal. Using a plastic stencil and screen, students make a shaped piece of handmade paper from cast-off scraps. Flower and vegetable seeds are added to the pulp. When dry, the rough-textured paper can be decorated with paint or drawing materials and glued to the front of a card. When planting season arrives, place the shape in the soil to make a beautiful garden.

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K – 8

Artists' Stamps

This lesson plan is designed to celebrate fine artists by honoring them with a "commemorative stamp." This project also introduces students to philately, the study and collection of stamps.

3 – 6

Solar-Powered Prints

A "cyanotype" is a photographic print made when UV light is exposed to a photo-sensitive paper. This lesson plan is a simple new process involving two safe and familiar classroom favorites — Nature Print Paper and Scratch Art. The finished arwork has the appearance of a linoleum block print — without the use of cutting tools or ink.

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3 – 8

The Four Freedoms

During World War II, President Franklin Roosevelt delivered a State of the Union speech in which he spoke of four basic freedoms he dreamed of being available to everyone in the world. Artist Norman Rockwell interpreted these freedoms in a series of popular paintings published by the Saturday Evening Post in 1943. This lesson plan challenges students to consider the concept of freedom: what it meant to a president, an artist and what it means to them today.

3 – 6
8

Art RX Journal

Exercise for art is as important as exercise for sports or rehearsal for theatre, as it fosters a continual pursuit of excellence. In this lesson, to exercise their artistic creativity, students keep a day-by-day art journal. Each page should be a simple statement of a different idea or small thought for the day.

K – 12
Special Education

Fiber Fusion

This project starts with a 12" x 12" piece of muslin upon which a variety of papers, fabrics, colors and textures are added. Paper Cloth can be sewn with a sewing machine, cut with scissors, folded and reused. It is hard to tear! The finished and dry material may be wrinkled, or placed between two sheets of paper and ironed to flatten. Color can be added using different mediums.

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K – 12

Monoprint "Screams" on Clay

Students monoprint images of their faces onto a piece of flat clay, then "morph" it to look like the face in Edvard Munch's famous portrait "The Scream".

K – 4

Recycled Plastic Collage

Rather than allowing more plastic to end up in a landfill, raise your students' level of social conscience and demonstrate the art elements of line, shape and texture with this lesson in "green" art. Twist and form recycled plastic into coils and shapes on a piece of adhesive-backed film and view in reverse. It's a tidy way to create a collage — no glue or paint required.

3 – 12

Reverse Pastel Painting

Where standard painting builds an image from the background forward, a reverse painting is created in a backward fashion — foreground first — with each phase applied so the background finishes the painting. A backing of metallic foil reflects light through the pastel in the same manner as gilding.

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3 – 12

Rex-Lace Appliqué

The traditional folk craft of straw appliqué — using various shades of dry straw adhered to a rigid surface — has been practiced in many nations. Students can create their own appliqué designs with a very modern medium: bright, vinyl craft lacing — familiar for making lanyards and bracelets — easily cut in pieces and laid side-by-side on an adhesive surface to form colorful designs.

K – 6

Simple Suminagashi Monoprints

Suminagashi is a process in which Sumi ink is floated on the surface of plain water, then transferred to a sheet of paper. Each monoprint is like a fingerprint — unique and unreproducible.

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3 – 12
Special Education

Insoluble Paintings

Based on the scientific concepts of insolubility and density, this technique seals water-based paint and mineral oil inside a laminating pouch. The different densities cause the liquids to repel one another in an ever-changing and interactive piece that continually flows and responds to touch.

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K – 12
Special Education

No-Blender Pulp Painting

This project is a simple, tidy way to create the look of pulp painting without the mess of a blender or even the use of adhesive. Non-bleeding tissue paper is combined with water and agitated (torn) so that the paper fibers separate and make a rough pulp. Pressing the paper onto an absorbent (canvas) surface causes the fibers to re-bond with one another and, when dry, form a thicker, stronger paper.

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K – 12
Special Education

Paper Molas

Molas are the brightly colored applique panels made only in the San Blas region of Panama by the Kuna Indians. Once the paper Molas are completed, have the children discuss their importance to the Kuna Indian women and their culture.

4 – 6

No Sew Molas

The Kuna culture flourishes today in the San Blas Islands with the vibrant trade of native Molas — brightly colored cotten panels that have been hand-sewn for many decades. Kuna women use both appliqué and reverse appliqué sewing techniques. These easy “no sew” Molas are made with felt and glue, rather than stitching.

K – 8

Simple Perspective with the Artist’s Grid Canvas

For a first lesson in one-point linear perspective, a grid is a perfect tool for beginning painters. It eliminates time spent measuring and marking, allowing students to achieve perfect accuracy on their first try.

4 – 12

Clay Divisionism

Neo-Impressionistic artists of the late 1800s developed a pictorial technique in which they placed specific brushstrokes of pure color directly on their canvas instead of mixing colors first on a palette. In this lesson plan, students will create balls of air dry clay and attach them collage-style to a self-adhesive board to recreate the Divisionism approach to painting.

2 – 6

Woodsies “Extraordinaire”

This project is quick and inexpensive but big on creativity. In addition to the wood shapes, all that is needed is a little glue, paint, marker and enough imagination for embellishment. Add a pin back or magnet for function.

2 – 8
Special Education

Woven Felt Wall Hanging

The fine art of weaving is explored using acrylic felt. This lesson also offers an opportunity to discuss fabric used for clothing, blankets and other items found in various cultures

3 – 12

Huichol Clay Painting

This lesson plan uses intensely colorful, easy-to-use Model Magic air-dry clay in place of yarn to create paintings similar to the art of the Huichol tribe. Students create “strings” of clay and press them together on a rigid surface. to create symbolic images and designs.

3 – 8

Natural Twig Journals

This simple bookmaking project can achieve great results with a wide variety of ages. Using nature as a theme, it's a perfect place to record nature sketches, foliage collections and personal observations of the world around us.

K – 12
Special Education

On a Starry Night...

Art history is an excellent discipline to accompany this lesson plan, as students become familiar with masterpieces by various artists. Students will choose an artwork that inspires them from a specifictime, genre or culture, and paint their own version on a cardboard frame.

3 – 8

Screen Print Collage

Using a single large screen divided into multiple small square window panes, a class of 15-20 students create their own individual art project that becomes part of the whole. A lesson plan from Speedball.

3 – 12

Shaped Storybook

Design a “big” storybook.Children can write the story and choose something in the story to be the book cover. The Story Paper can be cut to the shape of the book cover.

K – 3

Sparkle Fish

Everyone has something unique and wonderful to share with the world, as illustrated in the sparkling story of the “The Rainbow Fish”, by Marcus Pfister. This is a simple and tidy art project with a special surprise for students — what they think are “ugly” scales are revealed to be sparkly, holographic ones!

K – 5

Stencil City

Stencil City is a place that only exists on paper. It is created by cutting stencils in shapes of buildings and then using them to create areas of color against a black background. The end result is a nightglow cityscape.

2 – 8

Texture Critters

Oaxacan woodcarvings of animals are decorated with whimsical color and loaded with all-over designs. This project lets students explore simple shapes and textures by drawing an outline shape of an animal then filling it in with as many textures and patterns as they can think of.

2 – 8

Torn Paper Collage Journals

An easy bookmaking lesson that works across the entire curriculum. Students make books to use as journals or scrapbooks and fill with personnel stories or poetry, sketches or photos.

3 – 12
Special Education

Torn Paper Pictures

This project lets students work without scissors, using their fingers as tools. Papers are torn into shapes and then used to create an image that is a clearly defined and recognizable subject. The lesson also includes the collage technique of overlapping papers to unify the pieces of the design.

K – 4

Towers and Turrets

This lesson plan gives students the opportunity to learn about the concept of architecture, particularly towers and turrets.Using watercolor painting techniques and tracing, cutting, and gluing skills,students create lines, patterns and textures while understanding the concept of near being larger, far being smaller.

3 – 6

Transparent Banner Paintings

Painting on a transparent medium not only allows the interaction of light within the painted surface, it also projects colorful cast light and shadow onto walls, floors and surrounding objects.

3 – 12

Very, Very Simple Decorative Papers

Gathering flowers, leaves, fiber, ribbons and newspapers can expand children’s awareness of their environment. Results are awesome! Make printmaking papers, cards, book covers, picture frames and photo mats.

K – 4
Special Education

Water-Based Monotype

Students will learn basic drawing and painting skills through monotype using Akua inks and a variety of brushes, sponges or even fingers to apply and modify their drawings — it’s safe and easy to clean up.

3 – 8

Paper Weaving

A simple lesson to explore the basic concepts of weaving.

3 – 8

Positive & Negative Space

Minimal resources, great results! This lesson promotes an awareness of shape and space.

K – 8

Global Village

These paper dolls are wonderful to combine with the Global Village Paper. They can easily be turned into old-fashioned paper dolls, displayed in chains and hung. Or create a globe and arrange dolls around the total outside edge.

K – 5

Graph Paper Patterns

Adaptable for almost any age level, the basis for this lesson is very simple: define a space and fill it with a repetition of color, line and shape to make what we define as a Pattern.

3 – 8

Expanded Images

This drawing project gives creativity a nudge by having children select a photo to start the drawing and then expanding it with related subject matter drawn all around it.

K – 3

Faux Stained Glass Lanterns

Examples of intricately-designed stained glass can be found around the world: from gothic and medieval cathedral glass, to the art of Louis Tiffany and John La Farge. This project creates the look of stained glass in a simple process using Scratch-Art® Clear-Scratch™ film and permanent Sharpie® markers.

3 – 8

Creative Paper Making

Teach your students how to make paper with this project.

3 – 8

Bling Bling Mosaics

The new metallic paints are beautiful. Mix with different types of paints and "Glitter It" mediums to make paper tiles.

K – 6

Braille Paintings

Explore the beauty of Braille

3 – 8

Easy Fabric Batik with Glue

Explore the beauty of fabric batik without the danger of hot wax or dyes. Simply trace a design onto muslin with washable glue and add brilliant color.

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3 – 8

Home Town Map

As they create maps of their route between their homes and their schools, students learn about distance, signs, symbols, landmarks and safety.

K – 6

Mean Green

In painting, color can be used to describe emotions, feelings and ideas. Students select a color and paint a monochromatic theme of their choosing.

K – 12

Mini Monets

This project uses pastels; a favored medium of Impressionist artists – drawn onto matte surface Shrink Film. The chalk of the pastels doesn't actually shrink, it simply condenses along with the film to form rich, intense areas of color.

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3 – 10

Monoprinting with Watercolor Markers

A simple project that introduces students to printing.

1 – 8
Special Education

Multi-Foot Drawing

Develop an awareness of natural lines from unlikely sources. It’s an active lesson that incorporates math, art — and giggles!

K

Pastel Fresco Secco

"Secco" is the term used for applying color to dry plaster, the manner Da Vinci used in his famed "The Last Supper." Using Plaster of Paris, students create drawings then purposefully add stress fractures.

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1 – 12

Ribbon Weave

"Paper, paint and ribbon are used to develop a pattern with contrasting textures and colors."

K – 6

Simple Perspective

"A beginning lesson in one-point linear perspective. Grid Canvas eliminates time spent measuring and marking, allowing students to achieve perfect accuracy on their first try."

4 – 12

Ultimate Paisley Patterns

First seen in Persian fabric design, the signature floral kidney and tear shapes of Paisley prints are a great lesson in pattern and rhythm. French curves and colored pencils are used to draw colorful versions on construction paper.

3 – 12

Asian Banners

Introduce students to calligraphy, ink, folding and dyeing techniques. The end result is a beautiful banner they will be proud to hang up!

3 – 8

A.T.C. Artist Trading Cards

Artist Trading Cards are a fascinating pastime for a great number of professional artists. The cards are always 2½" × 3½", a size that fits into standard baseball card storage sleeves

K – 7
Special Education

Bread Spread

This lesson will spark students’ creativity as they use an unconventionalmaterial — French bread — to enhance their pastel paintings

K – 6

Bugs

This lesson plan encourages students to explore shape and color by creating original and whimsical insects from brightly-colored, torn paper.

K – 4

Carnival Scratch Art Mask

Explore the history of carnival masks from various cultures. Ornate and colorful masks are easy to create with Scratch Art Film and permanent markers.

K – 8

Ceramic Tile Painting

Oven baked water-based acrylic paint on glazed tile looks like kiln fired glazed tile. The paint is available in a wide range of colors and can be layered and blended to make other colors.

K – 12

Collagraph Printmaking

A very creative and experimental form of printmaking, collagraphs can be made with cardboard, yarn, fabric, leaves, tape and more.

2 – 8

Crazy Quilt Texture Boards

Students will enjoy exploring the wide variety of textures they can create with acrylic modeling paste on a rigid surface.

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3 – 8

Drawing with Thread

"Drawing with Thread" is an interpretation of work by Wassily Kandinski in 1913. Kandinski is called the first totally abstract artist. Free flowing water color and line suggests but does not define images.

K – 8

Buffalo Hides

The Native American tribes of the plains tanned and prepared buffalo hides, then painted them with symbols and story-telling pictures that told their tribal history and honored the spirits.

K – 4

Masterpiece Magnetic Puzzles

Create classroom fun with magnetic puzzles, a great exercise for classroom art history discussions. Each student can take home a masterpiece for their refrigerator.

K – 4

Aboriginal Hand Prints

The stenciled hand print and aboriginal style drawings help children to relate to the man from the Australian Aboriginal Culture, while helping them to understand the use of line in art.

K – 4

Marbleized Paper

Even young students can achieve beautiful results — without the use of chemicals or special materials.

K – 12

click to collapse

Grades 5 – 8

 

Grade Level

NEW! Matisse Prints du Soleil

Henri Matisse survived cancer to find a renewed energy and expressionism in artworks he called “scissor paintings.” Inspired by his cut-paper shapes, students can use sunlight or an artificial source to create color-saturated prints on fabric or paper.

K – 12
Special Education

NEW! “Selfies” (exactly where I want to be)

Creating self portraits is a snap with this easy technique! Facial proportions and features are traced onto clear film, then layered over a background of a student’s own choosing — a location where she or he would most like to take a “selfie.”

K – 8

NEW! Torn Metal Collage

Inspired by Byzantine mosaics and tapestries, Austrian artist Gustav Klimt was acclaimed for his gilded paintings. Students use metallic paper to create their own opulent artwork, which is then gently embossed and “antiqued” with tempera.

3 – 12
Special Education

NEW! Black Velvet Mystery Painting

Applying oil pastels to black rayon fabric makes a striking composition, but when students add UV paint and a black light, the finished paintings really glow.

K – 12

NEW! Curtain of Leaves Monoprint

Many artists have used trees as an inspiration for their work. Pressed leaves and texture tools are used to make one-of-a-kind, double-sided monoprints. Using a flexible printing block as a plate makes it easy!

3 – 12

NEW! Shibori Kimono

Experiment with Japanese paper-dyeing techniques using traditional rice papers, then share papers to create simple origami kimonos. The result is a stunning combination of art and culture.

3 – 12

NEW! Distressed Cold Wax Drawing

NOTE! The liquid wax used in this lesson plan is now tinted green. Artwork produced using this process will vary from the examples shown. This drawing process uses a reduction technique that involves etching or scratching an image into the wax, filling it with acrylic, then selectively removing color and wax by wiping and further etching. The remaining wax on the page will create mid-range values of gray and green, depending on how much is removed.

5 – 12

NEW! Simple Silk Screen in the Round

Silk screening is made simple with the use of an embroidery hoop frame and Mod Podge! Simply draw an image on silk screen fabric with a pencil and paint around the outside with Mod Podge. Pull fabric ink though with a squeegee and you're done! Add handpainted details to add even more color.

2 – 12

NEW! Wayang Kulit Shadow Puppetry

Tell a story through a traditional Indonesian shadow puppet play! Make a puppet that looks like leather by dampening and crinkling black cardstock, then create interesting patterns with paper punches. Finish with metallic markers and glue to dowels!

K – 12

Anaglyph Artistry

Make a composition for viewing with 3-D glasses! Turn an original drawing into a three-dimensional anaglyph using red and blue transfer paper with red and blue markers. Then, make the 3-D glasses necessary to make it pop!

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2 – 12

Artist’s Challenge Coins (ACC’s)

Challenge Coins are specially designed and minted for service personnel to recognize an achievement, enhance morale, or to signify membership in (or experience on) a particular mission. Create a personal Artist's Challenge Coin (ACC) by making a small print, collage, stamp, or photo appliqué one side of a coin-shaped wooden disk, and a challenge or message on the reverse.

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K – 12
Special Education

Decalcomania: Glue Paint Symmetry Prints

“Decalcomania” was a techique was used by Surrealists to create impromptu paintings controlled largely by chance. Much like a Rorschach Ink-Blot test, they would search for hidden imagery and develop it into a finished painting. This tidy and highly interactive process uses Glue Paint in a finger painting-style of application — without actually touching it. Looking for hidden images and contour lines in the print will fuel the imagination of a young Surrealist!

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K – 12
Special Education

Lessons on Lascaux

Create a cave wall that crackles with authenticity! Using a paste made with powdered tempera and a Dura-Lar stencil, make a beautiful 3-D cave creation.

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3 – 12

Muslin Masterpiece

Create a beautiful textile design using dye sticks and block printing.

K – 12

The Secret Life of your Pet!

Disquise your pet or favorite animal in a fantasy environment with easy photo manipulation.

K – 12

Easy-Outline Botanical Illustration Prints

Although photography and modern printing processes have replaced the need for cataloguing plant life with detailed drawn and painted illustrations, botanical illustration is still a beloved art. To make an accurate rendering of a plant, students can create an impression in plaster, then trace the shape and details with colored pencil, ink, or watercolor. Mixing and shading for color accuracy and identifying the plant are some of the skills that will be learned in this exercise.

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K – 12

“Gawu” — African Inspired Tapestry

Ghana-born artist El Anatsui is known internationally for his large-scale sculptures called “Gawu,” a composite of the words “ga,” meaning something made of metal and 'wu,” meaning a fashioned garment. In this lesson, students create their own tapestries as a response to El Anatsui's art, using African kente to discover rhythm and pattern in art. Recycled materials can be used, including folded papers and labels.

K – 12
Special Education

Glue Paint Symmetry Prints

Finger Painting has never been so fun — or so very tidy! This project incorporates glue paint — basic white glue tinted with any shade of watercolor. It dries with a beautiful transparency that is enhanced when applied to a clear sheet. When the sheet is folded, the colors can be blended and moved about the page, without actually touching it!

K – 12
Special Education

Burroughs on Burlap

Printmaking on burlap results in a beaufitul rusticity.

3 – 12

Color Field Sketchbook

Stain painting was a successful technique employed by Color Field artists Helen Frankenthaler and Morris Louis. They poured diluted acrylic color over large canvases to form “veils” of brilliant color. In this lesson, students will first learn a simple process for creating their own drawing pad, then stain and design a canvas cover for it.

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3 – 12

“Nesting” with Wool

Roll up a felted masterpiece! Students easily create beautiful wool paintings using soap, water, and a little elbow grease.

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K – 12

Prairie-Style Stained Glass Clings

Frank Lloyd Wright referred to his stained glass windows as “light screens” because they interacted with the view behind them, rather than covering or obscuring it. Here, students use geometry and repeating patterns to create a vinyl window cling that incorporates the ideals of Prairie-Style Design.

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K – 12

White on White Collagraph

Printmaking — starring textures and shapes! A collagraph printing plate is created on a canvas panel using textures found in the classroom, textured gel mediums, or even textures from nature! After a final coat of gel medium is applied, the plate and paper are run through a printing press.

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3 – 12

Sumi-e Resist Painting

NOTE! The liquid wax used in this lesson plan is now tinted green. Artwork produced using this process will not look like the examples shown. Practice the ancient art of sumi-e painting with a modern twist! Paint with diluted wax resist, then reveal your masterpiece by applying black sumi-e ink over the top. The addition of watercolor gives the painting even more interest.

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K – 12

Sheepish Composition

This lesson plan introduces wool roving, which is the raw, washed wool from the sheep that is then dyed a variety of beautiful colors. The wool strands will be used to "paint" onto a canvas of felt. The wool is very easily "felted" or punched into the background with a felting needle.

K – 12

Changing Faces

With this fun project, facial features become puzzle pieces that can be changed over and over again. It's a light and humorous way to examine the endless variety found in human faces and skin tones.

K – 8

Eye-Popping Paper Curls

Quilling is also known as paper filligree, paper rolling, mosaic or paper folding (even though the paper is really curled). In this project, students will try their hand at quilling in a truly sculptural way. By using much larger, thicker strips of paper, the finished product "pops" out in a very optical way. By using black on white, the effect is even further emphasized.

3 – 12

Paper Memory Quilt

The stitching together of layers of padding and fabric may date as far back as ancient Egypt. In America, quilt-making was common beginning in the late 18th century. A paper memory quilt is a fun way to keep ephemera (paper items) that have significance. This project will teach important design skills as pieces of paper are cut apart and reassembled. Insight into pattern, rhythm and repetition is gained.

2 – 12

Scrimshaw-Style Yupo Engraving

As early as 1750, New England whalers passed the time by engraving nautical artwork on bones, tusks, etc. As a means of experiencing this traditional American craft, students can etch into Yupo using scratch tools, then fill the lines with oil pastel.

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5 – 12

String Painting

Inspired by Huichol Nierikas — beautiful paintings made from yarn pressed onto beeswax — this is a simple way for students to experience the color, geometric linework and symbolism of this Native American art form. Using colorful string applied to an adhesive-backed piece of felt, students create their designs without messy glue or sharp cutting tools.

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3 – 12

Tibetan Wishing Banner

Tibetan wish or prayer flags traditionally are used to promote peace, compassion, strength and wisdom. Tibetans do not believe that the flags carry prayers to the gods, but rather that their messages and wishes will be blown by the wind to spread goodwill and compassion into all-pervading space. In this project, students will use a liquid wax resist that will be painted onto silk rectangles and need not be removed. Vibrant color and a final gold embellishment finish the piece.

2 – 12

WonderFoam Collagraph Prints

WonderFoam is familiar to almost everyone who has ever presented a craft project to children — but, if you'd like to move beyond the "foamies" to a real art technique, incorporate WonderFoam into printmaking! “Collagraph” is a process in which materials are arranged collage-style on a rigid surface, coated with tempera paint and then transferred to paper. Students learn to make repeating patterns with shapes.

K – 6
Special Education

Byzantine Medallions

The wealthy Byzantine Empire had a huge influence on personal ornamentation. Characterized by extensive iconography, pendants and medallions were widely produced to denote faith, office or rank. For this project, students use air-dry clay and colorful rhinestones to create their own Byzantine-style medallions. Gilded with gold powder and finished with a gloss coating, they can be used as ornaments or placed outdoors as mini stepping stones.

K – 12

Impressionistic Marker Painting

You won't believe what these markers can do! The juicy, alcohol-based ink reacts with itself or with hand-sanitizer to make painterly drawings on clear plastic film.

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3 – 12

Acrylic “Skins”

This project utilizes acrylic paint, but in a totally unique way...dried! Acrylic paint "skins" are easily created just by brushing paint on a non-stick palette or baker's parchment and letting it dry. You can use this plastic, flexible paint in a number of ways to create mosaics, mixed media collage, stained glass-like effects, jewelry, book covers and more!

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K – 12

Embossed Metal Encaustics

Considered a lost art for many centuries, encaustic painting is enjoying a resurgence because of modern techniques, tools and materials. While encaustic painting requires moving molten wax from a heating element to a surface, the technique used in this lesson plan creates textured “reservoirs” in metal foil that channel and cradle sprinkled wax chips as they melt. Interesting dimensions and contrasts between the metal and translucent wax occur when cooled.

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5 – 12

Monotype Hoop-La

Functioning as both a painting and a print, a Monotype is unique and irreproducible. The “hoop-la” over Monotype can be experienced in your classroom with this simplified, safely water-based process using acrylic paint, printing foam and fabric. The technique builds the print a layer at a time and tools are used to remove or “subtract” color between layers. Stretch the finished print ona gold macramé ring for an instant frame.

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3 – 12

Fantastic Faux Fossils

Students create their own “fossil bed” by modeling three-dimensional shapes of animals, plants or insects, then “burying” them beneath layers of tissue paper. Add earth-tone pastels to make them look as if they just came from an excavation site.

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K – 12

Illuminated Initials

The practice of illumination — decoration of pages with ornate lettering, luminous color and precious metals, was developed during the middle ages when literacy was rare and books were even more so. With this process, students design one of their own initials on reflective board and add transparent color — it appears to glow with reflective light from within.

3 – 8

Egg-stra Easy Watercolor “Crunch”

Traditionally, eggshell mosaics are made by first dying then positioning each shard individually — a time-consuming and delicate process. This project introduces a new way to crush and color eggshells, creating intricate veining and texture all at once without pre-dying or arranging each fragment. The simple glue-and-paint process and satisfying “crunch!” of breaking eggshells will delight children of all ages and skill levels.

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K – 12
Special Education

Thematic Clay Picture Frames

A lesson plan from AMACO®. Students select their favorite photo and design a custom picture frame to display it. After the bisque firing, the picture frames will be painted and decorated using the new AMACO® Teacher's Choice and Teacher's Palette low-fire glazes.

K – 6

Peace Windows: in the style of Marc Chagall’s stained glass

Late in his career, artist Marc Chagall produced a number of paintings in glass with colorful, dream-like images symbolizing peace, love, tolerance and faith. In reality, Marc Chagall’s life was filled with tragic events and the world he lived in was anything but peaceful. In light of this fact, students can begin to understand an artist’s ability to share healing, inspiration and encouragement, using “peace” as a theme.

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K – 8
Special Education

“Print & Go” T-Shirts

Printing creative T-shirts and fabrics doesn’t always require stencils and screens — students can easily design their own giant stamps and paint them any way they want. Even if each shirt displays the same message, each will be a completely unique work of art! This process is perfect for group settings — schools, camps, daycare centers, clubs, family reunions and special events — but it is also ideal for countless home decorating and craft projects.

K – 8
Special Education

Stencil a Painting

Stencils and repeated patterns have been used in painting as long ago as 9,000 years, when early humans placed their hands against cave walls and outlined them in charcoal or paint. In this lesson, even a stencil made of basic shapes can be effective. Each stencil can be used repeatedly, and by changing oil pastel color, overlapping images, or using only a part of an image, the result is a cohesive composition that has depth and color fusion.

4 – 12

Watercolor Texture Casts

Molding, casting, sculpting, painting and monoprinting — this simple project pulls all of these together into one low-relief sculpture that demonstrates the elements of texture and color. Texture is defined in clay by pressing objects in or sculpting with tools. Next, the clay is painted with watercolor and covered with papier mâché, which lifts the color as it dries, absorbing it directly into the casting.

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3 – 12

Color Scramble

In the 1960’s, Frank Stella became known for his minimal geometric paintings of concentric squares that used color to create visual movement. Each concentric square of color related to the next, whether they were harmonic or contrasting colors. In this lesson plan, students consider color relations and “paint” a Stella-style work with colored masking tape,

4 – 12

Graffiti Fun Art

Encourage students to design a personal and stylized signature or “tag.” The tag can be a given name, a nickname or something they’ve made up to represent themselves. This school version of graffiti shows students that lettering is not only important in communicating, but that it can also be an artistic expression.

1 – 6

Itajime Decorative Paper

Itajime Shibori is a technique for folding, clamping and dyeing paper or fabric resulting in beautiful designs – very similar to tie-dye. The folds and clamps keep the dye or ink from penetrating fully in certain areas making patterns and giving a dimensional appearance on a flat surface. This project is a great way to teach students the scientific concept of diffusion and color mixing.

3 – 12

Master Palettes

Drawing on the reverse side of a matte sheet of acetate, students create “windows” into the work of a chosen artist, using similar colors, subject matter and style to describe the artist’s focus. See if the class can guess which artists are represented on each student’s “palette.”

K – 6

On the Wall Motifs

Students select a commercial business and consider images, symbols and colors that will best represent the company. The repeated “wallpaper” patterns are made with a stamp designed and carved by the students. This fun project will help children understand how simple images communicate a message, whether in business or elsewhere.

4 – 6

Chenille Stem Stitchery

Spanish painter Joan Miró is known for his playful art. Although he was a world renowned artist, his work gives the impression it could have been created by a child. Miró was interested in reducing characters to their simplest forms and using very basic, bright colors. He felt some of the best ideas were inspired by the simplest things. In this project, students attach and weave Chenille Stems onto stitchery canvas to make simple shapes and designs.

K – 6
Special Education

Drapo Dazzle

Inspired by the sequinned banners of Haiti, students will make a banner of their own design using a variety of glittery, sparkly, shiny materials and brilliant colors. Use this opportunity to learn about the art and history of Haiti, a unique blend of African, French, Spanish and Native Caribbean cultures.

K – 8

Making Elemental Drawing Materials

Blick Art Materials was not around to provide art supplies 32,000 years ago, but, somehow, the earliest humans found a way to draw and paint on cave walls using materials made from basic elements all around them. Similar to the Paleolithic era, students will make their own drawing tools by transforming simple materials from the classroom, and then using them to communicate through images.

K – 12

No-Fire Nouveau Tiles

Beginning in the early 1880s, the “Art Nouveau” style flourished in all forms of art. Beautiful pottery was mass-produced during this era, especially in the form of decorative tiles. Tube lining — a technique in which a design outline was created first and then filled in with color — is the definitive look of Art Nouveau. If kiln-glazed ceramics are not an option for your environment, this project is a way to produce glossy, hand-painted tiles that look like the real thing.

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K – 8
10 – 12
Special Education

Altered Penny Carpet

In the 1800s, many homes were decorated with “Penny Carpets”, made from miss-matched fabric cut into circles by tracing around a penny. Patches were then layered and stitched together to make a large piece. Students create a Penny Carpet with fabric that they design themselves using monoprinting techniques and fabric paint. Each section is sewed to felt swatches, then joined to make a larger piece of art.

Watch the Video

3 – 12

EZ Grout Mosaics

Students of all ages can mimic mosaic artisans throughout history with these easy tile-making and “grouting” techniques. Clay tiles are glued to a firm backboard and grouted with acrylic paint. This project is safe and simple enough for younger students and those with special needs.

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

Metal Magic Journals

The magic is in the color! Wax Pastels adhere to the slick surface of tooling foil and stay there. Students explore tools and texture plates to create designs in lightweight metal, then, using simple page-binding techniques, assemble a lovely hardcover book to use for notes, sketches, journaling, scrapbooking or photos.

3 – 8

Middle East Reflections

Geometric patterns occur in rich profusion throughout Islamic Cultures. This lesson is an invitation to look at the history and meaning behind patterns and view the work of a contemporary Iranian artist. Students design and assemble a reflective mosaic pattern using metallic papers on adhesive film. Easy and tidy...no glue!

K – 12

Quilt Block Collage

What we think of as “quilts” today — pieces of fabric sewn together to form blocks that collectively make a whole — did not become popular until the mid 19th century. Making quilts was a means of “recycling” fabric from clothing that was no longer usable. In this lesson plan, students make a quilt block using paper and glue rather than fabric and stitching. It’s a great way to recycle materials and illustrate a number of design principles — rhythm, pattern, balance and unity.

3 – 12

Painted Story Quilt

Quilt-making spans multiple centuries and cultures. It can teach math skills, record history, recycle cast-off materials and encourage cooperative efforts within a group...just for a few ideas! This lesson looks at the story quilts of Faith Ringgold. She surrounds her narrative paintings with a quilted border, creating stories in color, texture, and pattern. Students select their own story to illustrate, then paint fabric using watersoluble pastels and watercolor.

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K – 12
Special Education

"Diaper Wipe" Diffusion

This project demonstrates the physical process of osmosis. Water-based markers are diluted by filtering water through an ordinary wet wipe. The flow of the color is slowed and channeled by the presence of oil and alchohol in the wipe, creating random and interesting tie-dye-type patterns. Educational...and really fun to watch!

K – 5
Special Education

Earth Strata

The inside of the Earth holds hidden secrets very close to us, so dig a hole to uncover layers of mystery! A hole just 1" deep will show a very small example of soil strata or layers – including rocks, shells, fossils, geodes, water, oil and coal. This art project is based on geology but need not be scientifically accurate as students creatively incorporate texture and line.

1 – 6

Persian and Navajo Rug Bookmarks

This lesson plan explains two diverse and beautiful style of textiles: Persian carpets and Navajo rugs. Similar colors and geometric shapes are two common elements of both.

4 – 8

Photo Tinting

Turn a black and white photo into a "riot" of color! Tinting is a simple technique that challenges students of all ages to pay attention to detail, and even young children can do it with success. In this project, class pictures are enlarged, printed in black-and-white and tinted. The use of non-traditional colors is encouraged.

K – 6

"Rapper" Art

Collect and recycle product wrappers for a "green" art project worthy of good-citizen attention! Students save and trade wrappers to make a paper background, then choose words and phrases related to their "rapper" collage and cut them from thin foam to create a printing plate. "Rapper" Art is an easy process for making posters, book covers and signs in multiples.

K – 6

Souper Art

This is a whimsical introduction to nutrition and graphic design that invites students to make up an imaginary soup. National studies indicate that children eat about anything if the advertising is "crazy" or attractive to them, including vitamins and vegetables. Now its students' turn to entice peers to "buy" their soup! Anyone for Alligator Soup?

K – 6

Burlap Pastel Painting

This easily constructed project offers an exploration of texture, line and color – key elements of design. Younger children may take a more abstract approach with emphasis on texture and color. Older students will find the burlap easy to pull and the weave easy to manipulate, creating holes and lines. Subject matter such as buildings, landscapes and abstract designs are adaptable to varying grade levels.

K – 6

Plantable Pulp Cards

This is a great project for teaching recycling and renewal. Using a plastic stencil and screen, students make a shaped piece of handmade paper from cast-off scraps. Flower and vegetable seeds are added to the pulp. When dry, the rough-textured paper can be decorated with paint or drawing materials and glued to the front of a card. When planting season arrives, place the shape in the soil to make a beautiful garden.

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K – 8

Artists' Stamps

This lesson plan is designed to celebrate fine artists by honoring them with a "commemorative stamp." This project also introduces students to philately, the study and collection of stamps.

3 – 6

Model a Famous Painting in Friendly Plastic

Students will use Amaco Friendly Plastic to create a likeness of a famous painting or work of art.

7 – 10

Solar-Powered Prints

A "cyanotype" is a photographic print made when UV light is exposed to a photo-sensitive paper. This lesson plan is a simple new process involving two safe and familiar classroom favorites — Nature Print Paper and Scratch Art. The finished arwork has the appearance of a linoleum block print — without the use of cutting tools or ink.

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3 – 8

The Four Freedoms

During World War II, President Franklin Roosevelt delivered a State of the Union speech in which he spoke of four basic freedoms he dreamed of being available to everyone in the world. Artist Norman Rockwell interpreted these freedoms in a series of popular paintings published by the Saturday Evening Post in 1943. This lesson plan challenges students to consider the concept of freedom: what it meant to a president, an artist and what it means to them today.

3 – 6
8

Art RX Journal

Exercise for art is as important as exercise for sports or rehearsal for theatre, as it fosters a continual pursuit of excellence. In this lesson, to exercise their artistic creativity, students keep a day-by-day art journal. Each page should be a simple statement of a different idea or small thought for the day.

K – 12
Special Education

EZ Encaustics

EZ Encaustic uses only small amounts of soft decorating wax that may be softened by hand or by using low temperature heat. Also included are instructions for a Painterly Encaustic process, using melted wax.

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5 – 12

Fiber Fusion

This project starts with a 12" x 12" piece of muslin upon which a variety of papers, fabrics, colors and textures are added. Paper Cloth can be sewn with a sewing machine, cut with scissors, folded and reused. It is hard to tear! The finished and dry material may be wrinkled, or placed between two sheets of paper and ironed to flatten. Color can be added using different mediums.

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K – 12

Recycled Plastic Collage

Rather than allowing more plastic to end up in a landfill, raise your students' level of social conscience and demonstrate the art elements of line, shape and texture with this lesson in "green" art. Twist and form recycled plastic into coils and shapes on a piece of adhesive-backed film and view in reverse. It's a tidy way to create a collage — no glue or paint required.

3 – 12

Reverse Pastel Painting

Where standard painting builds an image from the background forward, a reverse painting is created in a backward fashion — foreground first — with each phase applied so the background finishes the painting. A backing of metallic foil reflects light through the pastel in the same manner as gilding.

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3 – 12

Rex-Lace Appliqué

The traditional folk craft of straw appliqué — using various shades of dry straw adhered to a rigid surface — has been practiced in many nations. Students can create their own appliqué designs with a very modern medium: bright, vinyl craft lacing — familiar for making lanyards and bracelets — easily cut in pieces and laid side-by-side on an adhesive surface to form colorful designs.

K – 6

Simple Suminagashi Monoprints

Suminagashi is a process in which Sumi ink is floated on the surface of plain water, then transferred to a sheet of paper. Each monoprint is like a fingerprint — unique and unreproducible.

Watch the Video

3 – 12
Special Education

Insoluble Paintings

Based on the scientific concepts of insolubility and density, this technique seals water-based paint and mineral oil inside a laminating pouch. The different densities cause the liquids to repel one another in an ever-changing and interactive piece that continually flows and responds to touch.

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

No-Blender Pulp Painting

This project is a simple, tidy way to create the look of pulp painting without the mess of a blender or even the use of adhesive. Non-bleeding tissue paper is combined with water and agitated (torn) so that the paper fibers separate and make a rough pulp. Pressing the paper onto an absorbent (canvas) surface causes the fibers to re-bond with one another and, when dry, form a thicker, stronger paper.

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

Paper Molas

Molas are the brightly colored applique panels made only in the San Blas region of Panama by the Kuna Indians. Once the paper Molas are completed, have the children discuss their importance to the Kuna Indian women and their culture.

4 – 6

Illuminated Text

Illumination is the decorating of books or manuscripts with ornate lettering, scrollwork, icons and images. This lesson plan introduces an easy and inexpensive way to apply metal leaf to a single letter, then embellish it using colored pencils.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

No Sew Molas

The Kuna culture flourishes today in the San Blas Islands with the vibrant trade of native Molas — brightly colored cotten panels that have been hand-sewn for many decades. Kuna women use both appliqué and reverse appliqué sewing techniques. These easy “no sew” Molas are made with felt and glue, rather than stitching.

K – 8

Simple Perspective with the Artist’s Grid Canvas

For a first lesson in one-point linear perspective, a grid is a perfect tool for beginning painters. It eliminates time spent measuring and marking, allowing students to achieve perfect accuracy on their first try.

4 – 12

Clay Divisionism

Neo-Impressionistic artists of the late 1800s developed a pictorial technique in which they placed specific brushstrokes of pure color directly on their canvas instead of mixing colors first on a palette. In this lesson plan, students will create balls of air dry clay and attach them collage-style to a self-adhesive board to recreate the Divisionism approach to painting.

2 – 6

Woodsies “Extraordinaire”

This project is quick and inexpensive but big on creativity. In addition to the wood shapes, all that is needed is a little glue, paint, marker and enough imagination for embellishment. Add a pin back or magnet for function.

2 – 8
Special Education

Woven Felt Wall Hanging

The fine art of weaving is explored using acrylic felt. This lesson also offers an opportunity to discuss fabric used for clothing, blankets and other items found in various cultures

3 – 12

Huichol Clay Painting

This lesson plan uses intensely colorful, easy-to-use Model Magic air-dry clay in place of yarn to create paintings similar to the art of the Huichol tribe. Students create “strings” of clay and press them together on a rigid surface. to create symbolic images and designs.

3 – 8

Natural Twig Journals

This simple bookmaking project can achieve great results with a wide variety of ages. Using nature as a theme, it's a perfect place to record nature sketches, foliage collections and personal observations of the world around us.

K – 12
Special Education

Neo Neon

Classic neon signs are a part of everyday American culture, crossing over lines of economics, geography and heritage. This lesson incorporates the glowing “light painting” impact of neon signage in a clean, neat and easy-to-understand learning experience.

5 – 8

On a Starry Night...

Art history is an excellent discipline to accompany this lesson plan, as students become familiar with masterpieces by various artists. Students will choose an artwork that inspires them from a specifictime, genre or culture, and paint their own version on a cardboard frame.

3 – 8

Screen Print Collage

Using a single large screen divided into multiple small square window panes, a class of 15-20 students create their own individual art project that becomes part of the whole. A lesson plan from Speedball.

3 – 12

Silk Suncatchers

The natural translucent quality of silk paired with transparent paints rivals the glow of stained glass when held up to the sun. This is an easy way to teach introductory silk paintin.

7 – 12

Sparkle Fish

Everyone has something unique and wonderful to share with the world, as illustrated in the sparkling story of the “The Rainbow Fish”, by Marcus Pfister. This is a simple and tidy art project with a special surprise for students — what they think are “ugly” scales are revealed to be sparkly, holographic ones!

K – 5

Stencil City

Stencil City is a place that only exists on paper. It is created by cutting stencils in shapes of buildings and then using them to create areas of color against a black background. The end result is a nightglow cityscape.

2 – 8

Texture Critters

Oaxacan woodcarvings of animals are decorated with whimsical color and loaded with all-over designs. This project lets students explore simple shapes and textures by drawing an outline shape of an animal then filling it in with as many textures and patterns as they can think of.

2 – 8

Tie-Dye Guitar T-Shirt

This outrageously fun guitar design can be created in 1-1/2 to 2 hours from start to the end of the dyeing process.

7 – 12

Torn Paper Collage Journals

An easy bookmaking lesson that works across the entire curriculum. Students make books to use as journals or scrapbooks and fill with personnel stories or poetry, sketches or photos.

3 – 12
Special Education

Towers and Turrets

This lesson plan gives students the opportunity to learn about the concept of architecture, particularly towers and turrets.Using watercolor painting techniques and tracing, cutting, and gluing skills,students create lines, patterns and textures while understanding the concept of near being larger, far being smaller.

3 – 6

Transparent Banner Paintings

Painting on a transparent medium not only allows the interaction of light within the painted surface, it also projects colorful cast light and shadow onto walls, floors and surrounding objects.

3 – 12

Van Gogh Clay Plaque

This lesson plan begins by focusing on line and texture as students sculpt a flat slab of clay, defining an impressionistic landscape. Once the clay has dried, students will paint the piece using a palette of colors inspired by Van Gogh.

5 – 8

Water-Based Monotype

Students will learn basic drawing and painting skills through monotype using Akua inks and a variety of brushes, sponges or even fingers to apply and modify their drawings — it’s safe and easy to clean up.

3 – 8

Paper Weaving

A simple lesson to explore the basic concepts of weaving.

3 – 8

Positive & Negative Space

Minimal resources, great results! This lesson promotes an awareness of shape and space.

K – 8

Melted Paintings

Part Salvidor Dali and part "Shrinky Dinks," this project compels students to reach beyond a traditional, flat painting and feeds their natural hunger for artistic experimentation.

7 – 12

Hand-Colored History

Students will easily connect with historical studies of their own community or family history.

5 – 12

Global Village

These paper dolls are wonderful to combine with the Global Village Paper. They can easily be turned into old-fashioned paper dolls, displayed in chains and hung. Or create a globe and arrange dolls around the total outside edge.

K – 5

Graph Paper Patterns

Adaptable for almost any age level, the basis for this lesson is very simple: define a space and fill it with a repetition of color, line and shape to make what we define as a Pattern.

3 – 8

Faux Stained Glass Lanterns

Examples of intricately-designed stained glass can be found around the world: from gothic and medieval cathedral glass, to the art of Louis Tiffany and John La Farge. This project creates the look of stained glass in a simple process using Scratch-Art® Clear-Scratch™ film and permanent Sharpie® markers.

3 – 8

Corrugated Cardboard Silhouettes

In this lesson, students cut papers into silhouette forms. The unity of shapes stress the principles and elements of design.

5 – 12

Corrugated Paper

Young people are encouraged to be aware of their surroundings and find squares, rectangles, rounds and the hardest triangles in everyday materials

5 – 8

Creative Paper Making

Teach your students how to make paper with this project.

3 – 8

Bling Bling Mosaics

The new metallic paints are beautiful. Mix with different types of paints and "Glitter It" mediums to make paper tiles.

K – 6

Braille Paintings

Explore the beauty of Braille

3 – 8

Burlap Weaving

The coarse, open weave of burlap substitutes for a weaving loom in this fiber art project.

5 – 12

Easy Fabric Batik with Glue

Explore the beauty of fabric batik without the danger of hot wax or dyes. Simply trace a design onto muslin with washable glue and add brilliant color.

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3 – 8

Flip Flop Drawing

A drawing becomes a painting, then flips back to a drawing again as students use variety to explore surfaces, media and techniques.

5 – 12

Home Town Map

As they create maps of their route between their homes and their schools, students learn about distance, signs, symbols, landmarks and safety.

K – 6

Mean Green

In painting, color can be used to describe emotions, feelings and ideas. Students select a color and paint a monochromatic theme of their choosing.

K – 12

Mini Monets

This project uses pastels; a favored medium of Impressionist artists – drawn onto matte surface Shrink Film. The chalk of the pastels doesn't actually shrink, it simply condenses along with the film to form rich, intense areas of color.

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3 – 10

Monoprinting with Watercolor Markers

A simple project that introduces students to printing.

1 – 8
Special Education

Paper Maki-e

Maki-e translates "sprinkle pictures" – the beautiful art of Japanese lacquerware. To achieve a similar look, cut and glue painted papers to a surface and sprinkle with metallic powdered pigments.

5 – 12

Pastel Fresco Secco

"Secco" is the term used for applying color to dry plaster, the manner Da Vinci used in his famed "The Last Supper." Using Plaster of Paris, students create drawings then purposefully add stress fractures.

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1 – 12

Perfect Proportion

"The “grid method” has been used for centuries to create accurate proportions when painting. Blick Exclusive Artist Grid Canvas makes it easier to place objects from a photograph and plot landscapes, still lifes and portraits."

5 – 12

Ribbon Weave

"Paper, paint and ribbon are used to develop a pattern with contrasting textures and colors."

K – 6

Shrink Art Mosaics

Create your own mosaic pieces — any design, shape or color you want them to be! This project combines the fun and excitement of Shrink Film with the fine art of mosaics.

5 – 12

Simple Perspective

"A beginning lesson in one-point linear perspective. Grid Canvas eliminates time spent measuring and marking, allowing students to achieve perfect accuracy on their first try."

4 – 12

Three Columns

The architectural style developed by the ancient Greeks has had such an influence on world civilization that it surrounds us still today. This block printing lesson introduces the three orders of Greek columns and challenges students to discover them in famous buildings and the surrounding community.

6 – 12

Ultimate Paisley Patterns

First seen in Persian fabric design, the signature floral kidney and tear shapes of Paisley prints are a great lesson in pattern and rhythm. French curves and colored pencils are used to draw colorful versions on construction paper.

3 – 12

Aloha Shirts

Create Hawaiian-inspired shirts with brightly-colored flowers, leaves, and fish by printing them using fabric paints. "Gyotaku" - the Japanese word for "fish print"- is a fun and exciting way to give shirts an island beach look.

5 – 8

Altered Images

Hand-altering photos is a practice nearly as old as photography itself. Here are some new ideas for embellishing digital prints, featuring Blick Studio Art Markers and Scratch-Art Tools.

5 – 12

Asian Banners

Introduce students to calligraphy, ink, folding and dyeing techniques. The end result is a beautiful banner they will be proud to hang up!

3 – 8

A.T.C. Artist Trading Cards

Artist Trading Cards are a fascinating pastime for a great number of professional artists. The cards are always 2½" × 3½", a size that fits into standard baseball card storage sleeves

K – 7
Special Education

Bread Spread

This lesson will spark students’ creativity as they use an unconventionalmaterial — French bread — to enhance their pastel paintings

K – 6

Carnival Scratch Art Mask

Explore the history of carnival masks from various cultures. Ornate and colorful masks are easy to create with Scratch Art Film and permanent markers.

K – 8

Ceramic Tile Painting

Oven baked water-based acrylic paint on glazed tile looks like kiln fired glazed tile. The paint is available in a wide range of colors and can be layered and blended to make other colors.

K – 12

Checkerboard

In this project, students will use simple geometry tools to make lines and circular shapes, then define a pattern within the boundaries of the overlapping shapes using the repetition of two colors. This is a good, easy introduction to the elements of line, pattern and shape.

5 – 8

Collagraph Printmaking

A very creative and experimental form of printmaking, collagraphs can be made with cardboard, yarn, fabric, leaves, tape and more.

2 – 8

Crazy Quilt Texture Boards

Students will enjoy exploring the wide variety of textures they can create with acrylic modeling paste on a rigid surface.

Watch the Video

3 – 8

Drawing with Thread

"Drawing with Thread" is an interpretation of work by Wassily Kandinski in 1913. Kandinski is called the first totally abstract artist. Free flowing water color and line suggests but does not define images.

K – 8

Marbleized Paper

Even young students can achieve beautiful results — without the use of chemicals or special materials.

K – 12

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Grades 9 – 12

 

Grade Level

NEW! Matisse Prints du Soleil

Henri Matisse survived cancer to find a renewed energy and expressionism in artworks he called “scissor paintings.” Inspired by his cut-paper shapes, students can use sunlight or an artificial source to create color-saturated prints on fabric or paper.

K – 12
Special Education

NEW! Torn Metal Collage

Inspired by Byzantine mosaics and tapestries, Austrian artist Gustav Klimt was acclaimed for his gilded paintings. Students use metallic paper to create their own opulent artwork, which is then gently embossed and “antiqued” with tempera.

3 – 12
Special Education

NEW! Black Velvet Mystery Painting

Applying oil pastels to black rayon fabric makes a striking composition, but when students add UV paint and a black light, the finished paintings really glow.

K – 12

NEW! Curtain of Leaves Monoprint

Many artists have used trees as an inspiration for their work. Pressed leaves and texture tools are used to make one-of-a-kind, double-sided monoprints. Using a flexible printing block as a plate makes it easy!

3 – 12

NEW! Shibori Kimono

Experiment with Japanese paper-dyeing techniques using traditional rice papers, then share papers to create simple origami kimonos. The result is a stunning combination of art and culture.

3 – 12

NEW! Distressed Cold Wax Drawing

NOTE! The liquid wax used in this lesson plan is now tinted green. Artwork produced using this process will vary from the examples shown. This drawing process uses a reduction technique that involves etching or scratching an image into the wax, filling it with acrylic, then selectively removing color and wax by wiping and further etching. The remaining wax on the page will create mid-range values of gray and green, depending on how much is removed.

5 – 12

NEW! Simple Silk Screen in the Round

Silk screening is made simple with the use of an embroidery hoop frame and Mod Podge! Simply draw an image on silk screen fabric with a pencil and paint around the outside with Mod Podge. Pull fabric ink though with a squeegee and you're done! Add handpainted details to add even more color.

2 – 12

NEW! Wayang Kulit Shadow Puppetry

Tell a story through a traditional Indonesian shadow puppet play! Make a puppet that looks like leather by dampening and crinkling black cardstock, then create interesting patterns with paper punches. Finish with metallic markers and glue to dowels!

K – 12

Anaglyph Artistry

Make a composition for viewing with 3-D glasses! Turn an original drawing into a three-dimensional anaglyph using red and blue transfer paper with red and blue markers. Then, make the 3-D glasses necessary to make it pop!

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2 – 12

Artist’s Challenge Coins (ACC’s)

Challenge Coins are specially designed and minted for service personnel to recognize an achievement, enhance morale, or to signify membership in (or experience on) a particular mission. Create a personal Artist's Challenge Coin (ACC) by making a small print, collage, stamp, or photo appliqué one side of a coin-shaped wooden disk, and a challenge or message on the reverse.

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K – 12
Special Education

Decalcomania: Glue Paint Symmetry Prints

“Decalcomania” was a techique was used by Surrealists to create impromptu paintings controlled largely by chance. Much like a Rorschach Ink-Blot test, they would search for hidden imagery and develop it into a finished painting. This tidy and highly interactive process uses Glue Paint in a finger painting-style of application — without actually touching it. Looking for hidden images and contour lines in the print will fuel the imagination of a young Surrealist!

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K – 12
Special Education

Lessons on Lascaux

Create a cave wall that crackles with authenticity! Using a paste made with powdered tempera and a Dura-Lar stencil, make a beautiful 3-D cave creation.

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3 – 12

Muslin Masterpiece

Create a beautiful textile design using dye sticks and block printing.

K – 12

The Secret Life of your Pet!

Disquise your pet or favorite animal in a fantasy environment with easy photo manipulation.

K – 12

Easy-Outline Botanical Illustration Prints

Although photography and modern printing processes have replaced the need for cataloguing plant life with detailed drawn and painted illustrations, botanical illustration is still a beloved art. To make an accurate rendering of a plant, students can create an impression in plaster, then trace the shape and details with colored pencil, ink, or watercolor. Mixing and shading for color accuracy and identifying the plant are some of the skills that will be learned in this exercise.

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K – 12

“Gawu” — African Inspired Tapestry

Ghana-born artist El Anatsui is known internationally for his large-scale sculptures called “Gawu,” a composite of the words “ga,” meaning something made of metal and 'wu,” meaning a fashioned garment. In this lesson, students create their own tapestries as a response to El Anatsui's art, using African kente to discover rhythm and pattern in art. Recycled materials can be used, including folded papers and labels.

K – 12
Special Education

Glue Paint Symmetry Prints

Finger Painting has never been so fun — or so very tidy! This project incorporates glue paint — basic white glue tinted with any shade of watercolor. It dries with a beautiful transparency that is enhanced when applied to a clear sheet. When the sheet is folded, the colors can be blended and moved about the page, without actually touching it!

K – 12
Special Education

Burroughs on Burlap

Printmaking on burlap results in a beaufitul rusticity.

3 – 12

Color Field Sketchbook

Stain painting was a successful technique employed by Color Field artists Helen Frankenthaler and Morris Louis. They poured diluted acrylic color over large canvases to form “veils” of brilliant color. In this lesson, students will first learn a simple process for creating their own drawing pad, then stain and design a canvas cover for it.

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3 – 12

“Nesting” with Wool

Roll up a felted masterpiece! Students easily create beautiful wool paintings using soap, water, and a little elbow grease.

Watch the Video

K – 12

Prairie-Style Stained Glass Clings

Frank Lloyd Wright referred to his stained glass windows as “light screens” because they interacted with the view behind them, rather than covering or obscuring it. Here, students use geometry and repeating patterns to create a vinyl window cling that incorporates the ideals of Prairie-Style Design.

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K – 12

White on White Collagraph

Printmaking — starring textures and shapes! A collagraph printing plate is created on a canvas panel using textures found in the classroom, textured gel mediums, or even textures from nature! After a final coat of gel medium is applied, the plate and paper are run through a printing press.

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3 – 12

Sumi-e Resist Painting

NOTE! The liquid wax used in this lesson plan is now tinted green. Artwork produced using this process will not look like the examples shown. Practice the ancient art of sumi-e painting with a modern twist! Paint with diluted wax resist, then reveal your masterpiece by applying black sumi-e ink over the top. The addition of watercolor gives the painting even more interest.

Watch the Video

K – 12

Sheepish Composition

This lesson plan introduces wool roving, which is the raw, washed wool from the sheep that is then dyed a variety of beautiful colors. The wool strands will be used to "paint" onto a canvas of felt. The wool is very easily "felted" or punched into the background with a felting needle.

K – 12

Eye-Popping Paper Curls

Quilling is also known as paper filligree, paper rolling, mosaic or paper folding (even though the paper is really curled). In this project, students will try their hand at quilling in a truly sculptural way. By using much larger, thicker strips of paper, the finished product "pops" out in a very optical way. By using black on white, the effect is even further emphasized.

3 – 12

Paper Memory Quilt

The stitching together of layers of padding and fabric may date as far back as ancient Egypt. In America, quilt-making was common beginning in the late 18th century. A paper memory quilt is a fun way to keep ephemera (paper items) that have significance. This project will teach important design skills as pieces of paper are cut apart and reassembled. Insight into pattern, rhythm and repetition is gained.

2 – 12

Scrimshaw-Style Yupo Engraving

As early as 1750, New England whalers passed the time by engraving nautical artwork on bones, tusks, etc. As a means of experiencing this traditional American craft, students can etch into Yupo using scratch tools, then fill the lines with oil pastel.

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5 – 12

String Painting

Inspired by Huichol Nierikas — beautiful paintings made from yarn pressed onto beeswax — this is a simple way for students to experience the color, geometric linework and symbolism of this Native American art form. Using colorful string applied to an adhesive-backed piece of felt, students create their designs without messy glue or sharp cutting tools.

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3 – 12

Tibetan Wishing Banner

Tibetan wish or prayer flags traditionally are used to promote peace, compassion, strength and wisdom. Tibetans do not believe that the flags carry prayers to the gods, but rather that their messages and wishes will be blown by the wind to spread goodwill and compassion into all-pervading space. In this project, students will use a liquid wax resist that will be painted onto silk rectangles and need not be removed. Vibrant color and a final gold embellishment finish the piece.

2 – 12

Byzantine Medallions

The wealthy Byzantine Empire had a huge influence on personal ornamentation. Characterized by extensive iconography, pendants and medallions were widely produced to denote faith, office or rank. For this project, students use air-dry clay and colorful rhinestones to create their own Byzantine-style medallions. Gilded with gold powder and finished with a gloss coating, they can be used as ornaments or placed outdoors as mini stepping stones.

K – 12

Impressionistic Marker Painting

You won't believe what these markers can do! The juicy, alcohol-based ink reacts with itself or with hand-sanitizer to make painterly drawings on clear plastic film.

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3 – 12

Acrylic “Skins”

This project utilizes acrylic paint, but in a totally unique way...dried! Acrylic paint "skins" are easily created just by brushing paint on a non-stick palette or baker's parchment and letting it dry. You can use this plastic, flexible paint in a number of ways to create mosaics, mixed media collage, stained glass-like effects, jewelry, book covers and more!

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K – 12

Embossed Metal Encaustics

Considered a lost art for many centuries, encaustic painting is enjoying a resurgence because of modern techniques, tools and materials. While encaustic painting requires moving molten wax from a heating element to a surface, the technique used in this lesson plan creates textured “reservoirs” in metal foil that channel and cradle sprinkled wax chips as they melt. Interesting dimensions and contrasts between the metal and translucent wax occur when cooled.

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5 – 12

Monotype Hoop-La

Functioning as both a painting and a print, a Monotype is unique and irreproducible. The “hoop-la” over Monotype can be experienced in your classroom with this simplified, safely water-based process using acrylic paint, printing foam and fabric. The technique builds the print a layer at a time and tools are used to remove or “subtract” color between layers. Stretch the finished print ona gold macramé ring for an instant frame.

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3 – 12

Fantastic Faux Fossils

Students create their own “fossil bed” by modeling three-dimensional shapes of animals, plants or insects, then “burying” them beneath layers of tissue paper. Add earth-tone pastels to make them look as if they just came from an excavation site.

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K – 12

Egg-stra Easy Watercolor “Crunch”

Traditionally, eggshell mosaics are made by first dying then positioning each shard individually — a time-consuming and delicate process. This project introduces a new way to crush and color eggshells, creating intricate veining and texture all at once without pre-dying or arranging each fragment. The simple glue-and-paint process and satisfying “crunch!” of breaking eggshells will delight children of all ages and skill levels.

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

Stencil a Painting

Stencils and repeated patterns have been used in painting as long ago as 9,000 years, when early humans placed their hands against cave walls and outlined them in charcoal or paint. In this lesson, even a stencil made of basic shapes can be effective. Each stencil can be used repeatedly, and by changing oil pastel color, overlapping images, or using only a part of an image, the result is a cohesive composition that has depth and color fusion.

4 – 12

Watercolor Texture Casts

Molding, casting, sculpting, painting and monoprinting — this simple project pulls all of these together into one low-relief sculpture that demonstrates the elements of texture and color. Texture is defined in clay by pressing objects in or sculpting with tools. Next, the clay is painted with watercolor and covered with papier mâché, which lifts the color as it dries, absorbing it directly into the casting.

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3 – 12

Color Scramble

In the 1960’s, Frank Stella became known for his minimal geometric paintings of concentric squares that used color to create visual movement. Each concentric square of color related to the next, whether they were harmonic or contrasting colors. In this lesson plan, students consider color relations and “paint” a Stella-style work with colored masking tape,

4 – 12

Itajime Decorative Paper

Itajime Shibori is a technique for folding, clamping and dyeing paper or fabric resulting in beautiful designs – very similar to tie-dye. The folds and clamps keep the dye or ink from penetrating fully in certain areas making patterns and giving a dimensional appearance on a flat surface. This project is a great way to teach students the scientific concept of diffusion and color mixing.

3 – 12

Making Elemental Drawing Materials

Blick Art Materials was not around to provide art supplies 32,000 years ago, but, somehow, the earliest humans found a way to draw and paint on cave walls using materials made from basic elements all around them. Similar to the Paleolithic era, students will make their own drawing tools by transforming simple materials from the classroom, and then using them to communicate through images.

K – 12

No-Fire Nouveau Tiles

Beginning in the early 1880s, the “Art Nouveau” style flourished in all forms of art. Beautiful pottery was mass-produced during this era, especially in the form of decorative tiles. Tube lining — a technique in which a design outline was created first and then filled in with color — is the definitive look of Art Nouveau. If kiln-glazed ceramics are not an option for your environment, this project is a way to produce glossy, hand-painted tiles that look like the real thing.

Watch the Video

K – 8
10 – 12
Special Education

Altered Penny Carpet

In the 1800s, many homes were decorated with “Penny Carpets”, made from miss-matched fabric cut into circles by tracing around a penny. Patches were then layered and stitched together to make a large piece. Students create a Penny Carpet with fabric that they design themselves using monoprinting techniques and fabric paint. Each section is sewed to felt swatches, then joined to make a larger piece of art.

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3 – 12

EZ Grout Mosaics

Students of all ages can mimic mosaic artisans throughout history with these easy tile-making and “grouting” techniques. Clay tiles are glued to a firm backboard and grouted with acrylic paint. This project is safe and simple enough for younger students and those with special needs.

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K – 12
Special Education

Middle East Reflections

Geometric patterns occur in rich profusion throughout Islamic Cultures. This lesson is an invitation to look at the history and meaning behind patterns and view the work of a contemporary Iranian artist. Students design and assemble a reflective mosaic pattern using metallic papers on adhesive film. Easy and tidy...no glue!

K – 12

Quilt Block Collage

What we think of as “quilts” today — pieces of fabric sewn together to form blocks that collectively make a whole — did not become popular until the mid 19th century. Making quilts was a means of “recycling” fabric from clothing that was no longer usable. In this lesson plan, students make a quilt block using paper and glue rather than fabric and stitching. It’s a great way to recycle materials and illustrate a number of design principles — rhythm, pattern, balance and unity.

3 – 12

Painted Story Quilt

Quilt-making spans multiple centuries and cultures. It can teach math skills, record history, recycle cast-off materials and encourage cooperative efforts within a group...just for a few ideas! This lesson looks at the story quilts of Faith Ringgold. She surrounds her narrative paintings with a quilted border, creating stories in color, texture, and pattern. Students select their own story to illustrate, then paint fabric using watersoluble pastels and watercolor.

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K – 12
Special Education

Model a Famous Painting in Friendly Plastic

Students will use Amaco Friendly Plastic to create a likeness of a famous painting or work of art.

7 – 10

Art RX Journal

Exercise for art is as important as exercise for sports or rehearsal for theatre, as it fosters a continual pursuit of excellence. In this lesson, to exercise their artistic creativity, students keep a day-by-day art journal. Each page should be a simple statement of a different idea or small thought for the day.

K – 12
Special Education

EZ Encaustics

EZ Encaustic uses only small amounts of soft decorating wax that may be softened by hand or by using low temperature heat. Also included are instructions for a Painterly Encaustic process, using melted wax.

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5 – 12

Fiber Fusion

This project starts with a 12" x 12" piece of muslin upon which a variety of papers, fabrics, colors and textures are added. Paper Cloth can be sewn with a sewing machine, cut with scissors, folded and reused. It is hard to tear! The finished and dry material may be wrinkled, or placed between two sheets of paper and ironed to flatten. Color can be added using different mediums.

Watch the Video

K – 12

Recycled Plastic Collage

Rather than allowing more plastic to end up in a landfill, raise your students' level of social conscience and demonstrate the art elements of line, shape and texture with this lesson in "green" art. Twist and form recycled plastic into coils and shapes on a piece of adhesive-backed film and view in reverse. It's a tidy way to create a collage — no glue or paint required.

3 – 12

Reverse Pastel Painting

Where standard painting builds an image from the background forward, a reverse painting is created in a backward fashion — foreground first — with each phase applied so the background finishes the painting. A backing of metallic foil reflects light through the pastel in the same manner as gilding.

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3 – 12

Simple Suminagashi Monoprints

Suminagashi is a process in which Sumi ink is floated on the surface of plain water, then transferred to a sheet of paper. Each monoprint is like a fingerprint — unique and unreproducible.

Watch the Video

3 – 12
Special Education

Papier Collé Printmaking

In this lesson students will make a piece that is basically a printmaking “sandwich” — part painting, part lithograph, and part monoprint — incorporating Z*Acryl D2P Polyester Lithographic plates

Watch the Video

9 – 12

Insoluble Paintings

Based on the scientific concepts of insolubility and density, this technique seals water-based paint and mineral oil inside a laminating pouch. The different densities cause the liquids to repel one another in an ever-changing and interactive piece that continually flows and responds to touch.

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

No-Blender Pulp Painting

This project is a simple, tidy way to create the look of pulp painting without the mess of a blender or even the use of adhesive. Non-bleeding tissue paper is combined with water and agitated (torn) so that the paper fibers separate and make a rough pulp. Pressing the paper onto an absorbent (canvas) surface causes the fibers to re-bond with one another and, when dry, form a thicker, stronger paper.

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

Illuminated Text

Illumination is the decorating of books or manuscripts with ornate lettering, scrollwork, icons and images. This lesson plan introduces an easy and inexpensive way to apply metal leaf to a single letter, then embellish it using colored pencils.

Watch the Video

5 – 12

Simple Perspective with the Artist’s Grid Canvas

For a first lesson in one-point linear perspective, a grid is a perfect tool for beginning painters. It eliminates time spent measuring and marking, allowing students to achieve perfect accuracy on their first try.

4 – 12

Glass Divisionism

By studying the works of Signac and Seurat, students gain an understanding of the visual process of Divisionism. This lesson plan uses glass frit arranged on glass sheets to recreate the Divisionism approach to painting.

9 – 12

Woven Felt Wall Hanging

The fine art of weaving is explored using acrylic felt. This lesson also offers an opportunity to discuss fabric used for clothing, blankets and other items found in various cultures

3 – 12

Natural Twig Journals

This simple bookmaking project can achieve great results with a wide variety of ages. Using nature as a theme, it's a perfect place to record nature sketches, foliage collections and personal observations of the world around us.

K – 12
Special Education

Screen Print Collage

Using a single large screen divided into multiple small square window panes, a class of 15-20 students create their own individual art project that becomes part of the whole. A lesson plan from Speedball.

3 – 12

Silk Suncatchers

The natural translucent quality of silk paired with transparent paints rivals the glow of stained glass when held up to the sun. This is an easy way to teach introductory silk paintin.

7 – 12

Tie-Dye Guitar T-Shirt

This outrageously fun guitar design can be created in 1-1/2 to 2 hours from start to the end of the dyeing process.

7 – 12

Torn Paper Collage Journals

An easy bookmaking lesson that works across the entire curriculum. Students make books to use as journals or scrapbooks and fill with personnel stories or poetry, sketches or photos.

3 – 12
Special Education

Torn Paper Portraits

In this lesson, students “paint” with torn paper using a limited number of values found in a grayscale image. Using torn paper instead of direct painting requires them to visually divide the gray areas into separate shapes and define each shape individually.

9 – 12

Transparent Banner Paintings

Painting on a transparent medium not only allows the interaction of light within the painted surface, it also projects colorful cast light and shadow onto walls, floors and surrounding objects.

3 – 12

Watercolor Self-Portraits

This project will allow for exploring facial proportion, practice working in transparent watercolors and produce a self-expressive portrait.

9 – 12

Melted Paintings

Part Salvidor Dali and part "Shrinky Dinks," this project compels students to reach beyond a traditional, flat painting and feeds their natural hunger for artistic experimentation.

7 – 12

Hand-Colored History

Students will easily connect with historical studies of their own community or family history.

5 – 12

Corrugated Cardboard Silhouettes

In this lesson, students cut papers into silhouette forms. The unity of shapes stress the principles and elements of design.

5 – 12

Burlap Weaving

The coarse, open weave of burlap substitutes for a weaving loom in this fiber art project.

5 – 12

Flip Flop Drawing

A drawing becomes a painting, then flips back to a drawing again as students use variety to explore surfaces, media and techniques.

5 – 12

Mean Green

In painting, color can be used to describe emotions, feelings and ideas. Students select a color and paint a monochromatic theme of their choosing.

K – 12

Mini Monets

This project uses pastels; a favored medium of Impressionist artists – drawn onto matte surface Shrink Film. The chalk of the pastels doesn't actually shrink, it simply condenses along with the film to form rich, intense areas of color.

Watch the Video

3 – 10

Paper Maki-e

Maki-e translates "sprinkle pictures" – the beautiful art of Japanese lacquerware. To achieve a similar look, cut and glue painted papers to a surface and sprinkle with metallic powdered pigments.

5 – 12

Pastel Fresco Secco

"Secco" is the term used for applying color to dry plaster, the manner Da Vinci used in his famed "The Last Supper." Using Plaster of Paris, students create drawings then purposefully add stress fractures.

Watch the Video

1 – 12

Perfect Proportion

"The “grid method” has been used for centuries to create accurate proportions when painting. Blick Exclusive Artist Grid Canvas makes it easier to place objects from a photograph and plot landscapes, still lifes and portraits."

5 – 12

Shrink Art Mosaics

Create your own mosaic pieces — any design, shape or color you want them to be! This project combines the fun and excitement of Shrink Film with the fine art of mosaics.

5 – 12

Simple Perspective

"A beginning lesson in one-point linear perspective. Grid Canvas eliminates time spent measuring and marking, allowing students to achieve perfect accuracy on their first try."

4 – 12

Three Columns

The architectural style developed by the ancient Greeks has had such an influence on world civilization that it surrounds us still today. This block printing lesson introduces the three orders of Greek columns and challenges students to discover them in famous buildings and the surrounding community.

6 – 12

Ultimate Paisley Patterns

First seen in Persian fabric design, the signature floral kidney and tear shapes of Paisley prints are a great lesson in pattern and rhythm. French curves and colored pencils are used to draw colorful versions on construction paper.

3 – 12

Airbrushing on Silk

Simple beginners' project using 5 colors of paint and 2 types of stencils: positive and negative.

9 – 12

Altered Images

Hand-altering photos is a practice nearly as old as photography itself. Here are some new ideas for embellishing digital prints, featuring Blick Studio Art Markers and Scratch-Art Tools.

5 – 12

Batik T-Shirt

Learn the processes involved in traditional batik and in color layering with dye.

9 – 12

Canvas Loom Weaving

With its repetitive under-and-over motion, weaving creates a visual rhythm. Choose a few musical selections for students and have them interpret the six principles of design while listening to music: contrast, rhythm, unity, pattern, movement and balance.

9 – 12

Ceramic Tile Painting

Oven baked water-based acrylic paint on glazed tile looks like kiln fired glazed tile. The paint is available in a wide range of colors and can be layered and blended to make other colors.

K – 12

Marbleized Paper

Even young students can achieve beautiful results — without the use of chemicals or special materials.

K – 12

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Special Education

 

Grade Level

NEW! Matisse Prints du Soleil

Henri Matisse survived cancer to find a renewed energy and expressionism in artworks he called “scissor paintings.” Inspired by his cut-paper shapes, students can use sunlight or an artificial source to create color-saturated prints on fabric or paper.

K – 12
Special Education

NEW! Torn Metal Collage

Inspired by Byzantine mosaics and tapestries, Austrian artist Gustav Klimt was acclaimed for his gilded paintings. Students use metallic paper to create their own opulent artwork, which is then gently embossed and “antiqued” with tempera.

3 – 12
Special Education

Artist’s Challenge Coins (ACC’s)

Challenge Coins are specially designed and minted for service personnel to recognize an achievement, enhance morale, or to signify membership in (or experience on) a particular mission. Create a personal Artist's Challenge Coin (ACC) by making a small print, collage, stamp, or photo appliqué one side of a coin-shaped wooden disk, and a challenge or message on the reverse.

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

Decalcomania: Glue Paint Symmetry Prints

“Decalcomania” was a techique was used by Surrealists to create impromptu paintings controlled largely by chance. Much like a Rorschach Ink-Blot test, they would search for hidden imagery and develop it into a finished painting. This tidy and highly interactive process uses Glue Paint in a finger painting-style of application — without actually touching it. Looking for hidden images and contour lines in the print will fuel the imagination of a young Surrealist!

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

“Gawu” — African Inspired Tapestry

Ghana-born artist El Anatsui is known internationally for his large-scale sculptures called “Gawu,” a composite of the words “ga,” meaning something made of metal and 'wu,” meaning a fashioned garment. In this lesson, students create their own tapestries as a response to El Anatsui's art, using African kente to discover rhythm and pattern in art. Recycled materials can be used, including folded papers and labels.

K – 12
Special Education

Glue Paint Symmetry Prints

Finger Painting has never been so fun — or so very tidy! This project incorporates glue paint — basic white glue tinted with any shade of watercolor. It dries with a beautiful transparency that is enhanced when applied to a clear sheet. When the sheet is folded, the colors can be blended and moved about the page, without actually touching it!

K – 12
Special Education

WonderFoam Collagraph Prints

WonderFoam is familiar to almost everyone who has ever presented a craft project to children — but, if you'd like to move beyond the "foamies" to a real art technique, incorporate WonderFoam into printmaking! “Collagraph” is a process in which materials are arranged collage-style on a rigid surface, coated with tempera paint and then transferred to paper. Students learn to make repeating patterns with shapes.

K – 6
Special Education

Egg-stra Easy Watercolor “Crunch”

Traditionally, eggshell mosaics are made by first dying then positioning each shard individually — a time-consuming and delicate process. This project introduces a new way to crush and color eggshells, creating intricate veining and texture all at once without pre-dying or arranging each fragment. The simple glue-and-paint process and satisfying “crunch!” of breaking eggshells will delight children of all ages and skill levels.

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

Peace Windows: in the style of Marc Chagall’s stained glass

Late in his career, artist Marc Chagall produced a number of paintings in glass with colorful, dream-like images symbolizing peace, love, tolerance and faith. In reality, Marc Chagall’s life was filled with tragic events and the world he lived in was anything but peaceful. In light of this fact, students can begin to understand an artist’s ability to share healing, inspiration and encouragement, using “peace” as a theme.

Watch the Video

K – 8
Special Education

“Print & Go” T-Shirts

Printing creative T-shirts and fabrics doesn’t always require stencils and screens — students can easily design their own giant stamps and paint them any way they want. Even if each shirt displays the same message, each will be a completely unique work of art! This process is perfect for group settings — schools, camps, daycare centers, clubs, family reunions and special events — but it is also ideal for countless home decorating and craft projects.

K – 8
Special Education

Chenille Stem Stitchery

Spanish painter Joan Miró is known for his playful art. Although he was a world renowned artist, his work gives the impression it could have been created by a child. Miró was interested in reducing characters to their simplest forms and using very basic, bright colors. He felt some of the best ideas were inspired by the simplest things. In this project, students attach and weave Chenille Stems onto stitchery canvas to make simple shapes and designs.

K – 6
Special Education

No-Fire Nouveau Tiles

Beginning in the early 1880s, the “Art Nouveau” style flourished in all forms of art. Beautiful pottery was mass-produced during this era, especially in the form of decorative tiles. Tube lining — a technique in which a design outline was created first and then filled in with color — is the definitive look of Art Nouveau. If kiln-glazed ceramics are not an option for your environment, this project is a way to produce glossy, hand-painted tiles that look like the real thing.

Watch the Video

K – 8
10 – 12
Special Education

EZ Grout Mosaics

Students of all ages can mimic mosaic artisans throughout history with these easy tile-making and “grouting” techniques. Clay tiles are glued to a firm backboard and grouted with acrylic paint. This project is safe and simple enough for younger students and those with special needs.

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

Painted Story Quilt

Quilt-making spans multiple centuries and cultures. It can teach math skills, record history, recycle cast-off materials and encourage cooperative efforts within a group...just for a few ideas! This lesson looks at the story quilts of Faith Ringgold. She surrounds her narrative paintings with a quilted border, creating stories in color, texture, and pattern. Students select their own story to illustrate, then paint fabric using watersoluble pastels and watercolor.

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

"Diaper Wipe" Diffusion

This project demonstrates the physical process of osmosis. Water-based markers are diluted by filtering water through an ordinary wet wipe. The flow of the color is slowed and channeled by the presence of oil and alchohol in the wipe, creating random and interesting tie-dye-type patterns. Educational...and really fun to watch!

K – 5
Special Education

Art RX Journal

Exercise for art is as important as exercise for sports or rehearsal for theatre, as it fosters a continual pursuit of excellence. In this lesson, to exercise their artistic creativity, students keep a day-by-day art journal. Each page should be a simple statement of a different idea or small thought for the day.

K – 12
Special Education

Simple Suminagashi Monoprints

Suminagashi is a process in which Sumi ink is floated on the surface of plain water, then transferred to a sheet of paper. Each monoprint is like a fingerprint — unique and unreproducible.

Watch the Video

3 – 12
Special Education

Insoluble Paintings

Based on the scientific concepts of insolubility and density, this technique seals water-based paint and mineral oil inside a laminating pouch. The different densities cause the liquids to repel one another in an ever-changing and interactive piece that continually flows and responds to touch.

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

No-Blender Pulp Painting

This project is a simple, tidy way to create the look of pulp painting without the mess of a blender or even the use of adhesive. Non-bleeding tissue paper is combined with water and agitated (torn) so that the paper fibers separate and make a rough pulp. Pressing the paper onto an absorbent (canvas) surface causes the fibers to re-bond with one another and, when dry, form a thicker, stronger paper.

Watch the Video

K – 12
Special Education

Woodsies “Extraordinaire”

This project is quick and inexpensive but big on creativity. In addition to the wood shapes, all that is needed is a little glue, paint, marker and enough imagination for embellishment. Add a pin back or magnet for function.

2 – 8
Special Education

Natural Twig Journals

This simple bookmaking project can achieve great results with a wide variety of ages. Using nature as a theme, it's a perfect place to record nature sketches, foliage collections and personal observations of the world around us.

K – 12
Special Education

Torn Paper Collage Journals

An easy bookmaking lesson that works across the entire curriculum. Students make books to use as journals or scrapbooks and fill with personnel stories or poetry, sketches or photos.

3 – 12
Special Education

Very, Very Simple Decorative Papers

Gathering flowers, leaves, fiber, ribbons and newspapers can expand children’s awareness of their environment. Results are awesome! Make printmaking papers, cards, book covers, picture frames and photo mats.

K – 4
Special Education

Monoprinting with Watercolor Markers

A simple project that introduces students to printing.

1 – 8
Special Education

A.T.C. Artist Trading Cards

Artist Trading Cards are a fascinating pastime for a great number of professional artists. The cards are always 2½" × 3½", a size that fits into standard baseball card storage sleeves

K – 7
Special Education

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